iIG bullshit on the Bose ni Turaga caught out and exposed

 

NOT all the chiefs and clan leaders who attended the Bose ni Turaga last week were listed as title holders in the Native Land Commission register.BNT media liaison officer Kini Rarubi confirmed that though invitations were based on the names of chiefs listed in the NLC register, they also invited others who were unlisted.

“We had our list from the NLC, and we had some chiefs and traditional leaders who wanted to be part of this BNT and asked to be invited by the Fijian Affairs office in Suva,” he said.

His comments come after the Tui Cakau’s spokesman, Epeli Matata questioned the use of the titles Tui Navatu and Tui Saqani as part of the vanua of Cakaudrove.

Epeli Wainu attended the BNT as Tui Navatu and Sairusi Daugunu went as Tui Saqani.

Mr Rarubi said 285 chiefs and clan leaders were invited to the BNT, of which 215 were registered title holders.

He said the other 70 chiefs and clan leaders were not registered in NLC but were “independent” representatives of the vanua.

In total 123 chiefs and clan leaders attended the BNT, though it is unclear how many of those were registered title holders

(from FT online 23/12/08)

So judging from the comment highlighted above, out of the 285 chiefs invited, 215 were registed title holders. Of these registered chiefs, 123 turned up. However of the 123 that turned up, 70 were not registered chiefs with the NLC. So that leaves only 53 legitimate chiefs registered with the NLC that attended the now infamous meeting. No wonder, no official resolutions were passed because the numbers and clout was not there in the first place.

Again we raise the point that this chiefly bash of eating, drinking and useless illegal gathering cost tax payers $250,000. This is $250,000 that could have been used to ease the  run out medicines at our hospitals or buy books sadly missing from our schools. And to rub salt into the wound, this $250,00 was wasted at the same time another $250,ooo was poured down the drain to payout CJ Fatiaki. How about that? $500,000 just like that from these illegal dumbass thieves.

And we say merry Xmas to the rich and powerful because nothing is merry about the xmas of those of us down here at the bottom of the proverbial food chain and social class.

Please remember to register at www.solivakasama.org if you believe in our fight to restore democracy in our homeland.

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42 Responses to “iIG bullshit on the Bose ni Turaga caught out and exposed”

  1. Mark Manning Says:

    the theft of and wastage of so much of the taxpayers money , highlights the need for those responsible , to have all their property confiscated and sold once they are arrested so the money can be returned to the citizens of Fiji , from the sale of their assets .

  2. Mark Manning Says:

    You cannot be punished for the crime of a relative !
    is hairy bum admitting that those in the I.G. have indeed committed a crime ?

  3. FijiGirl Says:

    Take the UN Ban Further
    Back when Fiji first made it onto the maps of the Western world, ships would stop by and barter for food, spices and resources in exchange for knickknacks of varying value, from muskets to smoky mirrors. Later on, enterprising and less-than-honest travellers would barter similar items, this time for land, precious minerals (not too many to be found, before mining) and labour. The story of Musket Cove is that it got its name because the Chief was convinced to swap the land in exchange for a single musket.

    These stories show how our forebears, raised under communal ownership, didn’t really understand the value of what they were bargaining for, or what they were giving up. Had they truly understood that the ships crews were on the brink of starvation and scurvy, and had they been less hospitable, they would have been able to drive a far harder bargain for the fresh mangoes, bananas, uto, ivi, nama and native produce without which the sailors would have perished before they reached Tonga. But, as we know from our history, our forebears were not the greatest negotiators.

    And now, our President, Ratu Joseva Iloilo, the man with the highest powers in the land, the ‘here’ at which the proverbial buck stops, has carried on the great tradition by showing to all and sundry what hopeless negotiators Fijians can be.

    I am not writing this piece to criticise the President. There are others, far more worthy than I, to criticise him, and may the arrows of their comment be far more significant to him than anything I could write.

    Not only is the President lacking in negotiation skills. Frank Bainimarama, the hothead who has crowned himself Prime Minister and Finance Minister in perpetuity, must be one of the worst negotiators ever to walk the face of this planet.

    The way in which he came to power (goaded by Chodo), has retained power (guided by Chodo) and remains in power (in spite of Chodo) clearly demonstrates the path of a man who does not know how to give and take, consider options, evaluate, nurture or walk away. In short, demonstrates the path of a man who cannot, for the life of him, negotiate.

    Now he has bullied the President with Chodo’s Charter.

    This farcical endorsement by the President of the NCBBF Charter bears all the hallmarks of Vore’s regime to date.

    Like Vore’s build up to the last coup-d’etat, it is based on lies, bluster and a lot of hot air. Like the coup itself, it has no basis in reality or grassroots movement.

    Like the regime, it has no basis in the rule of law, remains illegitimate and will fall like the house of cards it is, when that moment inevitably comes and the rug is pulled from beneath Vore & Chodo’s feet, because what goes around will always come around.

    The time has come for the rug to be pulled, really pulled, from under their feet.

    A good negotiator knows how to construct a deal where all parties get some benefit. A good negotiator knows when to encourage, cajole, rally, back off and challenge. A good negotiator knows the true value of what it is he is offering up, and what he will accept in return. A good negotiator knows when to walk away. If you can’t walk away from a deal, you can’t negotiate.

    Since Vore can’t negotiate anyway, we know that he can’t walk away. What is the one thing that Vore cannot do without? The loyalty of the soldiers. Why do his men support him? Some do it because they are uneducated, some because they have no other career choice, some because they believe in his cause, some because they follow the herd. But most of all, they are loyal to him because the military puts food on the table for them and their families. What if that rug were to be pulled out from under Frank’s feet?

    I urge all those who would see democracy return to Fiji to contact the United Nations and implore them to extend the ban on Fiji soldiers for peacekeeping duties. Currently, the UN will not deploy Fiji’s soldiers to new assignments. Let the sanctions should go further. They should ban Fiji’s military from ANY UN assignments. Starve Vore and the Chodopu$$ of the money they (and their mistresses) crave so hungrily. Ban Fiji’s military from all UN duties until after free and fair elections.

    The EU, God bless them, is standing by their sugar sanctions. So are Aus, NZ, Canada and the USA. We all know that India, China and Korea are too craven to forego cheap, unsustainable resources that Vore is so happily swapping for smoky mirrors and muskets.

    God bless Fiji

  4. Peace Pipe Says:

    While we ponder contemplate muse and exercise restraint and patience the pig and piglets have taken the country over the precipice. The irrational people in the ig led by their big idiot have shown the world they are cannot be reasoned with and no amount of diplomacy will work with them. Thats the nature of the man who grabbed the govt with the barrel of the gun. All these pussyfooting won’t work with these culprits. Whats needed is swift and furious action which takes matter of days instead of a prolonged protracted episode thats taken two years and still counting. Even if we have to suffer 2 or 3 months but if it takes that long to remove the coupsters then so be it. Its better than suffering more unbearable years with them hanging on to power indefinitely.

    They are all unscrupulous as shown by their latest action during the last BNT. Like they did for he charter they would go to great lengths to portray majority support even if means faking and concocting conditions to make them look good.

  5. Ablaze Says:

    Christmas day tomorrow and our fight goes on. Please spare a thought for our brothers and sisters that will be wishing they could give a little more to their loved ones.

    Garbage In Garbage Out – What else can we say? This is the style of wannabe politicians who uses guns to get their way.

    EnufDictatorship I would like to add to your comments that I think these dopey people are now desperate to rectify the disrespectful way in which Dopey Big Chief treated the GCC.

    The Pig when he planned this coup thought that having the 2 Epelis and the Maras on his side was enough to lure all the other chiefs on his side. He was mistaken big time because all he has on his side as Kenneth Zinck named sub-chiefs and some are not even chiefs.

    Remember Rabuka worked with the GCC and after 2 year smart arse dopey Big Chief with all his Muslim, Indian whatever smart arse dopey Doras have realized that they need the backing of the GCC.

    I thank the firm stance taken by the Tui Cakau, Ro Teimumu, Ratu Joni etc etc not to involve themselves with these bunch of losers.

    EnufDictatorship Says:

    December 23, 2008 at 7:05 pm
    Ok bloggers this is what I see form all these…

    the travel bans by NZ and OZ are working

    the ceasation of funds and aids and job ops by the EU, UN, etc is working.

    Therefore, ALL the overseas/international measures to teach this illegal junta lessons are working.

    WHAT INTERNAL PRESSURE IS WORKING?

    Sad to say..nothing! nada! naught!

    We can see they’re buckling from international pressure BUT with the lack of internal pressure they just moosy on as if they own the Fiji..and they do!

    As, Prof Narsey said…Two years on, there has been no evidence of electoral fraud in 2006, or widespread corruption….The charter now remains the only excuse for the 2006 coup by Bainimarama and the military.

    And this FA-CHA includes ALL the deadly weapons of fear they wish to instill on our fellow countrymen.

    When are WE going to put a stop to all this? We cry for elections asap?

    But what are we doing for it to happen and we can get rid of all these illegals?

  6. Say True! Says:

    To the beloved people of Fiji fighting for democracy, a blessed and holy Christmas to you all. Vinaka to the team at Solivakasama, may the Lord guide and protect you. There are no further suitable words to describe the imbeciles in the IIG, they are now well and truly beyond description.

  7. Mark Manning Says:

    Fiji girl
    I personally e-mailed the U.n. , President of the U.S.A. and various Prime Ministers from the mid December 2006 to have Fijian peace keepers withdrawn totally from the U.N. missions etc. in order to stop funding to the Illegal I.G.
    The wheels of Justice turn very slowly , but finally , they do seem to have gotten the message !

  8. Ablaze Says:

    Peace Pipe I wish it was that easy! It will the problem instantly but never long term.

    I try to be positive all the time, don’t get me wrong many times I have felt dejected and hopeless and wish we had people capable of being suicide bombers to top them all off. Our people are not like that, they are one of the most kind, loving, caring race of people on this earth. However, some of us just need to be taught national pride, rule of law, respect and not be gullible as to be easily influenced by those of us that are there for their own agendas.

    For what you have suggested to happen it has to come from within the camp, one of them need to take the bull by its horn and lead the other soldier into telling Dopey Franky “Ship Out Or Else ??????????”

    I am beginning to feel that what is happening in our country is a lesson to each one of us and as Mark M. repeatedly says the people of Fiji will have to see for themselves the damage these lunatics will do to our country especially when its coffers dries up. We are beginning to see signs and this is the lesson required for all us never to allow this to ever happen again. Be patient for the “Beast will devour its own children” and the “Lord works in mysterious ways” This is fair and everyone is equal because there will be a lesson to be learnt after this tawdry affair. What good is all that money when you can’t spend.

    It will be a slow process and it looks like we all have to suffer first before we get what we want.

    Cheer up and Enyoy your Christmas with those your loved ones, I am even if it is just for a while.

  9. Ablaze Says:

    Meant to say solve the problem instantly!

  10. kaiveicoco Says:

    I agree MM ” you don’t get punished for the crime of your relatives ” confirms that AG Aiyaz is confessing they the IG have commited a crime !! what a choice

  11. Mark Manning Says:

    Thanks kaiveicoco
    I was wondering how long it would take before someone understood what I was trying to say !

  12. Mark Manning Says:

    Chaos reigns and we all get wet !
    So is it possible that either or both the Chinese and Indian Governments are behind this coup and in charge of it ?
    With the increasing expulsions , all we need now is someone to start telling Australians and new Zealanders to with draw their financial support by not having Fiji as a travel destination for holidays , imagine the chaos that would cause ands the pressure it would put on frank and Co.

  13. Say True! Says:

    MM – have a break bro – you’ll die of stress – relax for a day or two – and come back fighting refreshed as you always do.

  14. Mark Manning Says:

    ok , thanks , I needed that say true ! merry christmas !

  15. Cakau Says:

    Vinaka Ablaze – good thoughts for this time of the year.

    We all need to brighten the days ahead of us with those that we care about and love dearly.

    SILVER BELLS, SILVER BELLS IT IS CHRISTMAS IN FIJI

    RING A LING HEAR THEM RING SOON IT WILL BE CHRISTMAS DAY!

    ENJOY! ENJOY! NOT WORTH WORRYING ABOUT THOSE BAVULUS FOR A WHILE!

  16. Colin Bishop Says:

    The latest expulsions have my family discussing for the first time closing down the Fiji Branch of the Company.
    While I can afford to maintain the Company’s operating loss in Fiji I am unable to purchase and operate the Company as an individual .
    NZ Banks laugh if you suggest any financial interest in Fiji. Fiji Banks would see a Company currently operating at a loss and refuse to finance it.

    Will be talking hard in the next few weeks and may have to pour a lot of Christmas cheer down a few throats of family members to calm them down.

    One other Company operating in Fiji has just had one of its Directors change his mind and refuse to shift with his family to Fiji so the position is now to be advertised.

  17. Cakau Says:

    Found this on the internet while trying to get the lyrics for Chris Isaak’s “Have Yourself A Merry Christmas”

    It is a great read to reassure yourselves for a stronger fight in 2009.

    The tide is turning Its coming from our streets
    Read your wisdom, not the headlines
    Don’t let them tell you; “Its fine the way it is”
    Let it be your call, your agenda, not theirs

    You know better
    You must have our say
    You must show the way
    For every woman child and man have the power in this land

    Now don’t you worry
    The future will unfold if you are open and ready
    We all have choices, not just the chosen few
    So you must raise your voices and hold them steady

    For the time has now come to realise your dream
    To claim your future
    Yeah yeah we the people must have our say
    Every woman child and man have the power in this land.

    Have yourself a merry Christmas!

  18. Colin Bishop Says:

    New NZ Travel Advisory

    Fiji
    Reviewed: 24 December 2008, 12:40 NZDT
    Still current at: 24 December 2008

    There is some risk to your security in Fiji and we advise caution.

    Following the December 2006 military coup the security situation in Fiji remains uncertain. An Interim Government is in place led by the Commander of the Fiji military. The military also maintains effective control of a number of government departments and statutory authorities, including the police. There continue to be examples of a deteriorating respect for the rule of law in Fiji.

    On 23 December 2008, the Fiji Interim Government expelled New Zealand’s Acting High Commissioner from the country. The New Zealand High Commission in Suva will be closed over the holiday period but will be monitoring the security situation for New Zealanders in Fiji closely. Normal out of hours emergency arrangements will be in place. The expulsion could lead to increased tensions and New Zealanders in Fiji are advised to exercise particular caution at this time and maintain a low profile.

    Currently, Fiji is calm but a rapid deterioration to the situation, including the potential for civil disorder and violence, cannot be ruled out. New Zealand citizens in Fiji should be security conscious at all times, avoiding any demonstrations, large gatherings and areas of military activity, especially in and around the capital Suva.

    In June 2007, New Zealand’s High Commissioner to Fiji was also expelled by the military-led government. Subsequently, an Acting High Commissioner was appointed to represent New Zealand interests in Fiji. In February and May 2008, two expatriate newspaper publishers were also expelled from the country. In May 2008, credible threats were made against the Australian High Commissioner and staff of the Australian High Commission. A number of New Zealand citizens have been detained or deported by the military-led government in Fiji.

    Police vehicle checkpoints remain in place in urban areas, particularly at night. There are indications that crime levels are increasing in Fiji. Robbery, theft and incidents of assault have been reported by locals and tourists alike, with most occurring at night and in urban areas. New Zealanders are advised to take particular care with cash and credit cards, especially when using Automatic Teller Machines (ATMs).

    We recommend New Zealanders in Fiji, or planning to visit, monitor the media and this website to keep themselves informed of the security situation. New Zealanders in Fiji should also ensure their travel documents are kept up to date and are easily accessible.

    New Zealanders travelling or resident in Fiji should have comprehensive medical and travel insurance policies in place that include provision for medical evacuation by air.

  19. vuki Says:

    Please send a letter to: The Minister of New Zealand Foreign Affairs and Trade and ask him to throughout Bainimarama’s Daughter from New Zealand as an undesirable immigrant?

  20. Wini Says:

    @ Colin Bishop ……..We are just as concerned as you about the situation here but are not in a position to do anything against these thugs who have taken control. Just close down your export business and go to Vanuatu or the Solomons etc. Some Indian or Chinese businessman will pick up the pieces you have left. Thank you for all that you have done and we are sorry to see you leave. Have a merry Xmas and a happy new year

  21. Bin Ladin Says:

    Folks whether you like it or not I.G. is in charge and there is nothing you can do about it. Name calling and agent vinod type of infor posted on this blog will not have any impact on anythin!!. Be a suicide bomber brother!!….or sister!!…… Wire yourself up and blow up yourself in the middle of the military camp or inside parliament or somethin like that will probably make a difference for Fiji and the world to see!!. Otherwise all your effort is wasted!. You been looked upon as whingers who need a dick in their mouth to shut them up!!. If you can’t put up just shut up!!…the whole bang lot of you!!. Yavu lamusona!!

  22. Colin Bishop Says:

    Not Export but Infrastructure so not easy to up and shift and I don’t intend to.
    I’m not ready to give up on Fiji yet and hope my many friends in Fiji don’t have long to wait before the current dickheads are removed from power.
    If too many companies give up on Fiji then it will be so much harder to kick start the economy again after all this nonsence is over. Short of dropping dead in my old age I intend to be in Fiji for the next election even if I can’t vote.

  23. EnufDictatorship Says:

    Travel bans, coupsters and Mugabe by VICTOR LAL…READ ON BLOGGERS N MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL…

    12/24/2008
    Hundreds of thousands of dollars of taxpayers’ money has been spent on the National Council for Building a Better Fiji for it to come up with a solution on how best to end the contagious coup culture in Fiji.

    The coup culture, I want to argue, will only come to an end the day the coupsters and their fervent present and past supporters are hauled before the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, to explain their treasonous acts and their direct and indirect endorsement of the gross violation of human rights in Fiji.

    When the Fiji Times publisher Evan Hannah was deported out of Fiji on the heels of the Fiji Sun publisher Russell Hunter, I had written that Fiji was increasingly resembling Robert Mugabe’s Zimbabwe, and it was time the defenders of human rights, constitutionalism, and media freedom stood up to the military bullies, including against those who are hiding behind the slogan of “Lets Move Fiji Forward Together”. I argued that if we did not stand up to these bullies, they would continue to tighten their grip on the nation, and keep the law-abiding citizens in a state of perpetual subjugation through the power of the guns.

    As to the state of affairs in Zimbabwe, many local and international critics have finally come to the conclusion that Mugabe and his goons are a bunch of irredeemable souls, who will never give up power and privilege unless tougher actions are taken against them. One of the first to raise his voice recently was Nobel peace laureate, Archbishop emeritus Desmond Tutu, whose pronouncements on the process of reconciliation and healing had previously been happily deployed in the Fiji context.

    Archbishop Tutu, one of the most vociferous former opponents of apartheid in South Africa, told Dutch current affairs TV programme Nova that President Mugabe must step down or be removed by force. “I think now that the world must say: “You have been responsible with your cohorts for gross violations, and you are going to face indictment in The Hague unless you step down”,” Archbishop Tutu told the Dutch TV listeners, in whose city stands the ICC. When asked whether the African dictator should be removed by force, the Archbishop did not mince his words: “Yes, by force – if they say to him: step down, and he refuses, they must do so militarily.”

    “He has destroyed a wonderful country. A country that used to be a bread basket – it has now become a basket case,” Archbishop Tutu said. His call was endorsed by another churchman who is no stranger to dictatorship on the African continent. The Archbishop of York in the United Kingdom, Dr John Sentamu, a former Ugandan High Court judge and prisoner of the dictator Idi Amin, said Mugabe should be brought to stand trial at the ICC in The Hague.

    Writing in the British newspaper, The Observer, Archbishop Sentamu compared the situation in Zimbabwe to that he faced as a human rights defender and dissident in Uganda under Idi Amin: “Where are the African governments or leaders with the courage of Julius Nyerere, the former President of Tanzania, who ousted Idi Amin after recognising that his neighbour had become a tyrant and who marched an army into Uganda to bring an end to the killing fields?”

    He urged the international community to bring Mugabe and his closest supporters before The Hague to stand trial for their crimes against the people of Zimbabwe: “The time has come for Mugabe to answer for his crimes against humanity, against his countrymen and women and for justice to be done. The winds of change that once brought hope to Zimbabwe and its neighbours have become a hurricane of destruction with the outbreak of cholera, destitution, starvation and systemic abuse of power by the state. As a country cries out for justice, we can no longer be inactive to their call. Mugabe and his henchmen must now take their rightful place in The Hague and answer for their actions. The time to remove them from power has come.”

    Archbishop Sentamu urged the international community not to shirk from its responsibility, quoting Martin Luther King: “We will have to repent in this generation not merely for the hateful words and actions of the bad people, but for the appalling silence of the good people.” The Archbishop wrote: “When Jesus Christ wanted people to know what he was doing, he chose a passage from the Old Testament to describe his mission. It was a passage from the prophet Isaiah, written to encourage a disillusioned and demoralised people. It looked forward to a new day when there would be justice for people being treated unjustly and in poverty and release for the oppressed. It promised new life for the present and hope for the future. President Robert Mugabe was right when he said only God could remove him. That’s exactly what happens. No tyrant lives for ever. No cruel regime lasts. God acts. And he is acting. An international chorus is at last being raised to bring an end to Mugabe’s brutal regime.”

    The Ugandan-born Archbishop also dismissed Mugabe’s frequent criticism of his (Mugabe’s) critics (a familiar tune in Fiji against Australia and New Zealand) as “colonialist” or “imperialist”, arguing: “Mugabe may well brand anyone who criticises him as a ‘colonialist’ or an ‘imperialist’ for any action they take, but the people of Zimbabwe look to the international community, especially the SADC (Southern African Development Corporation), to heed the cries of their suffering and the voices of our own conscience.”

    The two archbishops were joined by other world leaders. The British Prime Minister Gordon Brown said it was time for the international community to tell Mugabe “enough was enough”. His call was repeated by US Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice. The Prime Minister of Kenya, Raila Odinga, had this message for his fellow African leaders: “It’s time for African governments to take decisive action to push him (Mugabe) out of power.”

    Several major international newspapers, including many on the African continent, echoed the Times of London which, in an editorial, had said replacing the regime in Zimbabwe was a humanitarian imperative. The United Kingdom, the paper argued, should support African calls for intervention in Zimbabwe and offer supporting troops. Justice delayed is justice denied.

    We may recall that some years ago when the coupist Sitiveni Rabuka was nominated as Fiji’s ambassador to the United States, I welcomed the appointment, writing in my column that “the ghost of Pinochet may hover over Rabuka in Washington”. For there was a well orchestrated and carefully crafted but secretive legal plan by a dedicated group of former Fiji residents to get Rabuka arrested in the United States for gross violation of human rights during the two 1987 coups.

    His nomination for the diplomatic post had coincided with the release of a US Senate report that month into the Chilean dictator and President Augusto Pinochet’s multi-million dollar bank accounts in the United States. That same month, Chile’s Supreme Court had stripped Pinochet of his immunity, paving the way for the trial of the then 88-year-old dictator on charges of human rights abuses.

    Pinochet had seized power in a 1973 coup and ruled Chile until 1990, and was a regular visitor to London until the House of Lords ruled in 1998 that he could be stripped of his diplomatic immunity under international law and be put on trial for human rights abuses.

    In 1999, on the eve of the Fiji general elections, I had written a long legal tract, suggesting why the self-appointed Major-General and Prime Minister of Fiji, Rabuka, should be stripped of his immunity and put on trial for the human rights abuses in Fiji. I pointed out that coup and human rights violations are like Siamese twins, for sooner or later the coupsters, in their zeal to control power and the nation’s purse strings, would turn on their opponents, reminding the nation of the warnings of the late Prime Minister Dr Timoci Bavadra, who had warned the Commonwealth meeting in Vancouver, Canada in 1987 that, “It will be a time of oppression, a time of isolation and a time of severe economic deprivations”.

    True to Bavadra’s predictions, grim stories of the torture, rape, and harassment of Indo-Fijians emerged, later corroborated by Amnesty International. According to reports, the Indo-Fijians were beaten, forced to stand in sewage pools and subjected to other forms of humiliating treatment. A ban was imposed on any form of entertainment, coupled with the imposition of strict Methodist sabbatarianism on Fiji’s Hindus and Muslims, whom the lay Methodist preacher considered religious pagans. The long anticipated Day of Judgment had finally arrived for the Indo-Fijians. I wrote: “Thousands fled abroad, many to the United States, where their former tormentor and oppressor might be heading for the prestigious diplomatic posting.”

    The late dictator Pinochet had claimed that he was “an angel” and that the abuses were carried out by his sub-ordinates. The courts had refused to accept his defence. In that column of mine, I had asked: “Were the human rights abuses against Indo-Fijians and some Fijians operating in a vacuum, and without the knowledge of the military strongman Rabuka?”

    What transpired during the dark days of Rabukism in Fiji, I stated, could be no better explained than by recalling an obscure and unreported judgement of the US Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in San Francisco between an indigenous Fijian soldier, Aminisitai Tagaga, v the Board of Immigrations Appeal (BIA) and the US Justice Department (Case Number 98-71251), delivered in September 2000. The judgment was delivered by Justice Stephen Reinhardt. Tagaga had applied for refugee status in the United States, and the court had granted him one, after holding that “an alien may qualify for refugee status after deserting homeland military forces that required his participation in race-based persecution of fellow citizens”.

    The Court heard that while a career officer in the RFMF, petitioner Aminisitai Tagaga was court-martialled for his resistance to an official policy of persecution of Indo-Fijians. He had refused to participate in the race-based arrest and detention of Indo-Fijians, and warned others of impending arrests. The military court revoked Tagaga’s privileges, sentenced him to house arrest, and transferred him to Lebanon to serve with peacekeeping forces there.

    Tagaga learned from other high-ranking officers that his reassignment was punishment for his political opposition to the military regime in Fiji, and that he faced arrest and treason charges if he returned home. After gathering his family, Tagaga fled to the United States and applied for asylum. He had established a substantial likelihood that he would be tried for treason if he returned to Fiji. His fear was based on direct reports from high-ranking Fijian military officials.

    The facts established, Justice Reinhardt ruled, that having already served a sentence imposed by the military regime, Tagaga fled Fiji because he feared that the regime would prosecute him for treason for, among other reasons, his refusal to participate in the persecution of Indo-Fijians. Furthermore, a government may not legitimately punish an official for refusing to carry out an inhumane order. Had Tagaga followed orders and participated in the persecution of Indo-Fijians, he would have been ineligible for asylum. Tagaga, according to Justice Reinhardt, adhered to higher principles of law by refusing to arrest Indo-Fijians and warning others of planned arrests. He qualified for asylum in the United States.

    The “Tagaga Judgment” and the catalogue of testimonies from the victims of the 1987 coups (from all races) became the basis of laying charges against Rabuka if he set foot on American soil. In the end, Rabuka didn’t take up his posting because he wanted to clear his name that he was allegedly involved in the 2000 Speight putsch. The next attempt to have Rabuka arrested was when it was learnt that he was on his way for a knee operation in India, and again circumstances intervened, to persuade the human rights activists to leave Rabuka alone, for this time he was to face inciting mutiny charges in Fiji.

    It must be stressed that just because Rabuka nor those highly visible coup supporters of his have never been brought to book for their roles in the 1987 coups, does not mean that coupsters and their sympathisers are free to commit violations of human rights if and when coups infect the body politic of Fiji.

    There are, in my opinion, several prime candidates, who can be hauled before The Hague following the 2006 coup; so let us lift the travel bans to test their invincibility, f or they assume that just because President Ratu Josefa Iloilo has signed a series of decrees granting them immunity from prosecution, they are “Untouchables”. The “Ghost of Pinochet” will always hover over their shoulders.

    If we are to break the coup culture in Fiji, the coupsters cannot, and must not, be allowed to escape from their treasonous acts. Australia and New Zealand should lift the travel bans, to enable the treasonous culprits to be carted off to The Hague.

    q The views expressed are those of Victor Lal and not that of Fiji Sun. E-mail: vloxford@gmail.com

  24. Ratu Sai Says:

    Merry Christmas all and live the moment, may in the new year all things being equal we just may have our country back.

    Anyways here’s hoping.

  25. Malekata Ravisa Says:

    @Bin Ladin: Vinaka vakalevu na volunteer. We look forward to offering condolences when you decide to start it off by rigging yourself and blowing yourself up at QEB! Go figure…..And Merry Xmas to you too!

  26. Mark Manning Says:

    An interesting article indeed by Victor Lal . this is the 1st. time I’ve ever heard of Human Rights violations by Rabuka . Personally I’ve always thought of his actions as treason .
    The time is coming on this Earth , when an International Military and Police Service will be able to work hand in hand with the International Court and go into any country to arrest cowardly dictators , rogue Commanders and Soldiers who would rather abuse , detain , torture and murder the very Citizens they have sworn to protect .
    As the Moslem’s say , God is Great , and indeed he is as he can finish it for any one of us , at his will .
    For those Moslems and Hindus who I have offended , I apologise .
    For as much as I detest the worshipping of idols and extreme Islamic views , I equally detest people who hide behind the mask of Christianity , in Gods name .
    Rabuka , along with all those involved in this and previous coups , definitely need to be brought before the International court in the Hague .
    This is not the 1st. time I have advocated such a move .
    I hope that this does happen one day , so all those who have been insulted , tortured , detained illegally and murdered , may find Justice once and for all .

    I think that S.V. should begin a campaign to expose all the Human rights violations since 1987 and tell us who was responsible for them .
    Do that and prove to me that you are true Christians !

  27. Talei Says:

    What else is new? Nothing this IG does surprises me anymore. They are a waste themselves, period!

  28. freedomfighter Says:

    Travel bans, coupsters and Mugabe

    12/24/2008
    Hundreds of thousands of dollars of taxpayers’ money has been spent on the National Council for Building a Better Fiji for it to come up with a solution on how best to end the contagious coup culture in Fiji.

    The coup culture, I want to argue, will only come to an end the day the coupsters and their fervent present and past supporters are hauled before the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, to explain their treasonous acts and their direct and indirect endorsement of the gross violation of human rights in Fiji.

    When the Fiji Times publisher Evan Hannah was deported out of Fiji on the heels of the Fiji Sun publisher Russell Hunter, I had written that Fiji was increasingly resembling Robert Mugabe’s Zimbabwe, and it was time the defenders of human rights, constitutionalism, and media freedom stood up to the military bullies, including against those who are hiding behind the slogan of “Lets Move Fiji Forward Together”. I argued that if we did not stand up to these bullies, they would continue to tighten their grip on the nation, and keep the law-abiding citizens in a state of perpetual subjugation through the power of the guns.

    As to the state of affairs in Zimbabwe, many local and international critics have finally come to the conclusion that Mugabe and his goons are a bunch of irredeemable souls, who will never give up power and privilege unless tougher actions are taken against them. One of the first to raise his voice recently was Nobel peace laureate, Archbishop emeritus Desmond Tutu, whose pronouncements on the process of reconciliation and healing had previously been happily deployed in the Fiji context.

    Archbishop Tutu, one of the most vociferous former opponents of apartheid in South Africa, told Dutch current affairs TV programme Nova that President Mugabe must step down or be removed by force. “I think now that the world must say: “You have been responsible with your cohorts for gross violations, and you are going to face indictment in The Hague unless you step down”,” Archbishop Tutu told the Dutch TV listeners, in whose city stands the ICC. When asked whether the African dictator should be removed by force, the Archbishop did not mince his words: “Yes, by force – if they say to him: step down, and he refuses, they must do so militarily.”

    “He has destroyed a wonderful country. A country that used to be a bread basket – it has now become a basket case,” Archbishop Tutu said. His call was endorsed by another churchman who is no stranger to dictatorship on the African continent. The Archbishop of York in the United Kingdom, Dr John Sentamu, a former Ugandan High Court judge and prisoner of the dictator Idi Amin, said Mugabe should be brought to stand trial at the ICC in The Hague.

    Writing in the British newspaper, The Observer, Archbishop Sentamu compared the situation in Zimbabwe to that he faced as a human rights defender and dissident in Uganda under Idi Amin: “Where are the African governments or leaders with the courage of Julius Nyerere, the former President of Tanzania, who ousted Idi Amin after recognising that his neighbour had become a tyrant and who marched an army into Uganda to bring an end to the killing fields?”

    He urged the international community to bring Mugabe and his closest supporters before The Hague to stand trial for their crimes against the people of Zimbabwe: “The time has come for Mugabe to answer for his crimes against humanity, against his countrymen and women and for justice to be done. The winds of change that once brought hope to Zimbabwe and its neighbours have become a hurricane of destruction with the outbreak of cholera, destitution, starvation and systemic abuse of power by the state. As a country cries out for justice, we can no longer be inactive to their call. Mugabe and his henchmen must now take their rightful place in The Hague and answer for their actions. The time to remove them from power has come.”

    Archbishop Sentamu urged the international community not to shirk from its responsibility, quoting Martin Luther King: “We will have to repent in this generation not merely for the hateful words and actions of the bad people, but for the appalling silence of the good people.” The Archbishop wrote: “When Jesus Christ wanted people to know what he was doing, he chose a passage from the Old Testament to describe his mission. It was a passage from the prophet Isaiah, written to encourage a disillusioned and demoralised people. It looked forward to a new day when there would be justice for people being treated unjustly and in poverty and release for the oppressed. It promised new life for the present and hope for the future. President Robert Mugabe was right when he said only God could remove him. That’s exactly what happens. No tyrant lives for ever. No cruel regime lasts. God acts. And he is acting. An international chorus is at last being raised to bring an end to Mugabe’s brutal regime.”

    The Ugandan-born Archbishop also dismissed Mugabe’s frequent criticism of his (Mugabe’s) critics (a familiar tune in Fiji against Australia and New Zealand) as “colonialist” or “imperialist”, arguing: “Mugabe may well brand anyone who criticises him as a ‘colonialist’ or an ‘imperialist’ for any action they take, but the people of Zimbabwe look to the international community, especially the SADC (Southern African Development Corporation), to heed the cries of their suffering and the voices of our own conscience.”

    The two archbishops were joined by other world leaders. The British Prime Minister Gordon Brown said it was time for the international community to tell Mugabe “enough was enough”. His call was repeated by US Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice. The Prime Minister of Kenya, Raila Odinga, had this message for his fellow African leaders: “It’s time for African governments to take decisive action to push him (Mugabe) out of power.”

    Several major international newspapers, including many on the African continent, echoed the Times of London which, in an editorial, had said replacing the regime in Zimbabwe was a humanitarian imperative. The United Kingdom, the paper argued, should support African calls for intervention in Zimbabwe and offer supporting troops. Justice delayed is justice denied.

    We may recall that some years ago when the coupist Sitiveni Rabuka was nominated as Fiji’s ambassador to the United States, I welcomed the appointment, writing in my column that “the ghost of Pinochet may hover over Rabuka in Washington”. For there was a well orchestrated and carefully crafted but secretive legal plan by a dedicated group of former Fiji residents to get Rabuka arrested in the United States for gross violation of human rights during the two 1987 coups.

    His nomination for the diplomatic post had coincided with the release of a US Senate report that month into the Chilean dictator and President Augusto Pinochet’s multi-million dollar bank accounts in the United States. That same month, Chile’s Supreme Court had stripped Pinochet of his immunity, paving the way for the trial of the then 88-year-old dictator on charges of human rights abuses.

    Pinochet had seized power in a 1973 coup and ruled Chile until 1990, and was a regular visitor to London until the House of Lords ruled in 1998 that he could be stripped of his diplomatic immunity under international law and be put on trial for human rights abuses.

    In 1999, on the eve of the Fiji general elections, I had written a long legal tract, suggesting why the self-appointed Major-General and Prime Minister of Fiji, Rabuka, should be stripped of his immunity and put on trial for the human rights abuses in Fiji. I pointed out that coup and human rights violations are like Siamese twins, for sooner or later the coupsters, in their zeal to control power and the nation’s purse strings, would turn on their opponents, reminding the nation of the warnings of the late Prime Minister Dr Timoci Bavadra, who had warned the Commonwealth meeting in Vancouver, Canada in 1987 that, “It will be a time of oppression, a time of isolation and a time of severe economic deprivations”.

    True to Bavadra’s predictions, grim stories of the torture, rape, and harassment of Indo-Fijians emerged, later corroborated by Amnesty International. According to reports, the Indo-Fijians were beaten, forced to stand in sewage pools and subjected to other forms of humiliating treatment. A ban was imposed on any form of entertainment, coupled with the imposition of strict Methodist sabbatarianism on Fiji’s Hindus and Muslims, whom the lay Methodist preacher considered religious pagans. The long anticipated Day of Judgment had finally arrived for the Indo-Fijians. I wrote: “Thousands fled abroad, many to the United States, where their former tormentor and oppressor might be heading for the prestigious diplomatic posting.”

    The late dictator Pinochet had claimed that he was “an angel” and that the abuses were carried out by his sub-ordinates. The courts had refused to accept his defence. In that column of mine, I had asked: “Were the human rights abuses against Indo-Fijians and some Fijians operating in a vacuum, and without the knowledge of the military strongman Rabuka?”

    What transpired during the dark days of Rabukism in Fiji, I stated, could be no better explained than by recalling an obscure and unreported judgement of the US Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in San Francisco between an indigenous Fijian soldier, Aminisitai Tagaga, v the Board of Immigrations Appeal (BIA) and the US Justice Department (Case Number 98-71251), delivered in September 2000. The judgment was delivered by Justice Stephen Reinhardt. Tagaga had applied for refugee status in the United States, and the court had granted him one, after holding that “an alien may qualify for refugee status after deserting homeland military forces that required his participation in race-based persecution of fellow citizens”.

    The Court heard that while a career officer in the RFMF, petitioner Aminisitai Tagaga was court-martialled for his resistance to an official policy of persecution of Indo-Fijians. He had refused to participate in the race-based arrest and detention of Indo-Fijians, and warned others of impending arrests. The military court revoked Tagaga’s privileges, sentenced him to house arrest, and transferred him to Lebanon to serve with peacekeeping forces there.

    Tagaga learned from other high-ranking officers that his reassignment was punishment for his political opposition to the military regime in Fiji, and that he faced arrest and treason charges if he returned home. After gathering his family, Tagaga fled to the United States and applied for asylum. He had established a substantial likelihood that he would be tried for treason if he returned to Fiji. His fear was based on direct reports from high-ranking Fijian military officials.

    The facts established, Justice Reinhardt ruled, that having already served a sentence imposed by the military regime, Tagaga fled Fiji because he feared that the regime would prosecute him for treason for, among other reasons, his refusal to participate in the persecution of Indo-Fijians. Furthermore, a government may not legitimately punish an official for refusing to carry out an inhumane order. Had Tagaga followed orders and participated in the persecution of Indo-Fijians, he would have been ineligible for asylum. Tagaga, according to Justice Reinhardt, adhered to higher principles of law by refusing to arrest Indo-Fijians and warning others of planned arrests. He qualified for asylum in the United States.

    The “Tagaga Judgment” and the catalogue of testimonies from the victims of the 1987 coups (from all races) became the basis of laying charges against Rabuka if he set foot on American soil. In the end, Rabuka didn’t take up his posting because he wanted to clear his name that he was allegedly involved in the 2000 Speight putsch. The next attempt to have Rabuka arrested was when it was learnt that he was on his way for a knee operation in India, and again circumstances intervened, to persuade the human rights activists to leave Rabuka alone, for this time he was to face inciting mutiny charges in Fiji.

    It must be stressed that just because Rabuka nor those highly visible coup supporters of his have never been brought to book for their roles in the 1987 coups, does not mean that coupsters and their sympathisers are free to commit violations of human rights if and when coups infect the body politic of Fiji.

    There are, in my opinion, several prime candidates, who can be hauled before The Hague following the 2006 coup; so let us lift the travel bans to test their invincibility, f or they assume that just because President Ratu Josefa Iloilo has signed a series of decrees granting them immunity from prosecution, they are “Untouchables”. The “Ghost of Pinochet” will always hover over their shoulders.

    If we are to break the coup culture in Fiji, the coupsters cannot, and must not, be allowed to escape from their treasonous acts. Australia and New Zealand should lift the travel bans, to enable the treasonous culprits to be carted off to The Hague.

    q The views expressed are those of Victor Lal and not that of Fiji Sun. E-mail: vloxford@gmail.com

  29. Damudamu Says:

    Vakacava mada me dua la na gang-bang levu me carubi vei Iloilo na tamata sega na betena vakalusi i lavo!

  30. Bin Ladin Says:

    Evavei mo liutaka o iko damudamu!, vidividi yani muri o malekata ravisa qai uvu sici se laga sere vana nomudrau mike o mark manning!. Dou veivutu me kida na mataka!. Merry christmas vana nomudou i vicovico!.

  31. Mark Manning Says:

    Bin Ladin
    Thank you and season’s greetings to you too !
    We actually sing carols on Christmas eve .

  32. Keep The Faith Says:

    Bin Ladin is a poor excuse for a human being and he thinks he is Fijian?!?

    Dou qarauni kemudou tikoga na viavia intel/mossad tiko cake i qori mai na keba. Keimami na dui wele dou na caroba yadudua mai — just look at how thin the FLP is becoming, membership wise.

    You are all really pathetic small fries…qai pathetic mai na whinging nei nomudou boso lailai o Aiyarse…tapping phones is NOTHING compared to what the superpowers have on you guys and all your so-called allies in the private sector.

    The ICC is beckoning all of youse…tick tock, tick tock, tick tock. Roll in 2009, because we want to watch some hangings and we’ll have our popcorn at the ready.

  33. Damudamu Says:

    Bin Ladin – Dau vinaka na ‘share’. Vacava daru share mada?

  34. Jone Biutiviti Says:

    Da kua so ni vakalusia na noda gauna vei bin ladin……….Laiva me vosavosa ca tu mai va ya…………..Kedatou toso ga e na kena wasei na veika lolovira e sa vakayacori tiko vei keda e daidai………..Na dina e na qai tasereki koya ga e nai vesu ni tevoro e sa vesuki koya tu………….Da nanumi koya ga e na noda masu me na vakacila vua na turaga na dina.

  35. Wini Says:

    Victor Lal mentions Aminisitai Tagaga’s case against Rabuka etc in his article above and paints a picture of an officer under duress to go arrest Indians etc under the orders from Rabuka.

    I note that when Rabuka celebrated his 60th birthday in the US back in September, Tagaga and his family were there celebrating the occassion too! Check out the photos on matavuvale.com.

    Sa du!

  36. Jose Says:

    @t Bin Laden, it would be very sweet indeed to rig myself up with detonations and blow up those places you mentioned. Unfortunately, I’m no muslim like you. So why don’t you do it. You are promised 70 virgins by your god on the other side.

  37. EnufDictatorship Says:

    Bloggers, I do see some light in this for having a way to haul these illegals to the World court…

    “There are, in my opinion, several prime candidates, who can be hauled before The Hague following the 2006 coup; so let us lift the travel bans to test their invincibility, for they assume that just because President Ratu Josefa Iloilo has signed a series of decrees granting them immunity from prosecution, they are “Untouchables”. The “Ghost of Pinochet” will always hover over their shoulders.

    If we are to break the coup culture in Fiji, the coupsters cannot, and must not, be allowed to escape from their treasonous acts. Australia and New Zealand should lift the travel bans, to enable the treasonous culprits to be carted off to The Hague.”

    YES, YES, YES….but how do we start..who has to file charges…THE PEOPLE?..like how?..then NZ/OZ lift travel sanctions..they go there and VOILA!!! apprehended, charged and carted off to Hagueville..yey..something to ponder about bloggers for a strategy for 2009!

    Bring it on! Maybe Victor Lal can be approached to give advise on the hows?

  38. Vuki Says:

    We all know that the minute Voreqe appointed himself as the IG Minister of Finance that he was going to misuse our Tax dollars for personal gain?If you want to know how to lay charges on the IG dictator Prime Minister the best man to call would be Mr Jai Ram Reddy he is one of the Judge in the UN International Court in the Hague . He can probably lay the Charge or get someone to do it on behalf of the people of Fiji.

  39. Jean d'Ark Says:

    There are two other fishy aspects of this BNT meeting!

    The first was the sudden banning of media reps halfway into the meeting. I understand this happened because many of the chiefs were questioning and opposing key aspects of the Charter (like the common name), The other reason was that in an attempt to regain the initiative of the meeting again, the IG lapsed into a bout of pro-Fijian rhetoric that would have even made the SDL blush. So just like the 2009 budget before it, this meeting made a nonsense of the Charter that it was supposed to promote.

    The second fishy thing was the amount of time it took them (more than a day) to actually produce a communique from the meeting. One of the reasons was the obvious lack of unity about the IG’s pre-determined position on all things Charter-related.

    But the second was that obviously that they would have had to list the names of the “chiefs” on the document – thus leaving their deception open to be caught out in writing. It took them a while to invent titles for the unregistered “title” holders.

  40. Tomu Says:

    We all know the reason why the BNT meeting was call and it was simply a divide and rule old administrative trick. It didn’t work this time since the IG head was too stupid to understand the trength of the GCC and our chiefly system and effect. Modern chiefs like the current Tui Cakau,Roko Tui Dreketi, Roko Tui Bau, All the Cakobaus are well educated and knows the importance of Fijian political Developments and progress. They’ve read world history and they know where their people are going and what they wants? You cannot deny the people the right to make decision for themselves. Voreqe you’re going down alongside your treasonous IG ministers!!!!

  41. loru Says:

    Tomu ,you are right about the IG intention, for calling the BNT but if you ask me,i think that the money used was absolutely worth it?
    At least they’ve now realised that they cannot manipulate Fijians.
    Because when it comes right down, to the nity gritty of it all, we all want the same things for our community?SELF PRESERVATION! I bet they won,t be calling another such meeting for a long time.
    The GCC is the only avenue they now must go back to, if they’re serious about taking the country forward?
    But we’re dealing with idiots, so we really don’t know what their next move is going to be?

  42. Katalina Balawanilotu Says:

    Not surprising.

    Those sub chiefs are a laughing stock selling their pathetic corrupt souls for 30 pieces of silver.

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