Clumsy threat backfires on Fijian usurper

images6

One of the first messages sent to John Key after National’s election came from Fiji’s military usurper, Commodore Frank Bainimarama.In it the commodore reportedly referred to Helen Clark with sentiments less than diplomatic.

Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd is said to have received a similar greeting a year ago when he defeated John Howard.

Clearly Fiji’s self-appointed ruler is aware of the possibilities presented by a change of Government.

But he has a strange idea of how to take an opportunity.

Any prospect that New Zealand’s new Government might make an early move to review the sanctions imposed on Fiji’s regime has probably disappeared with the threat to expel this country’s Acting High Commissioner in Suva over a visa denial.

The Government has no option but to ignore the threat and to retaliate in kind if it is carried out.

Commodore Bainimarama was lucky to be accorded the courtesy of a call from National’s Foreign Minister, Murray McCully, yesterday to discuss the issue.

His threat had already put Mr Key on the spot, causing the Prime Minister to affirm that his Government had “no intentions of lifting the ban on people travelling to New Zealand if they are part of the regime, or associated with the regime”.

New Zealand’s position would not change until Fiji took concrete steps towards democracy, Mr Key said, noting it was now impossible for Fiji to meet the Pacific Islands Forum deadline for elections.

So that, for the time being, is that.

New Zealand will remain as intransigent as Australia in maintaining sanctions that appear to be achieving nothing.

The illegitimate regime seems to be as firmly entrenched as ever it has been since the 2006 coup.

The highly selective travel sanctions are no more than an annoyance for officials and their families, and occasionally an embarrassment for this country when a sports event was cancelled or exemptions were made for purposes that suited the previous Government.

The visa issue that prompted the latest diplomatic incident is a case in point.

The applicant, George Nacewa, the son of a secretary to Fiji’s President, is a student at Massey University.

He needs a visa renewal to continue his studies.

In October the Labour Government refused him.

It seems harsh to make him pay for the coup his father serves but that is the nature of the sanctions.

It could have been a good case for Commodore Bainimarama to take up with the new Government had he gone the right way about it.

Instead, he sent an ultimatum: grant the visa or the Acting High Commissioner will be expelled, possibly with other New Zealand diplomats.

It would not be the first time; High Commissioner Mike Green was ordered to leave last June. The commodore’s abysmal timing is attested by the diplomatic response of Mr McCully.

“All I can say is that when you have sanctions of the sort we have in regard to Fiji, there are often pressure points and issues that arise,” he said of the threat.

“We try to manage those issues in a constructive fashion.”

The tone of those remarks was so much milder than the previous Government’s as to suggest National was ready to review New Zealand’s response.

If so, it now faces a difficult diplomatic decision.

Should it allow itself to be deflected by Commodore Bainimarama’s clumsy belligerence, or should it persist in seeking a more effective relationship?

If the goal remains to restore democracy and civil rights to a near neighbour, the Government cannot succumb to threats. If Fiji now waits a while for a new reception in Wellington, it has only itself to blame.

* http://www.nzherald.co.nz. This was the New Zealand Herald’s Editorial for yesterday.

Solivakasama is adding  names of the coup supporters in their list send names  you know to   Info@solivakasama.org   ,  the pressure is working.

Bloggers, don’t forget to register on www.solivakasama.org because our smart strategies beginning next year will be lobbying Governments about their citizens involved in treason in Fiji and people like John Samy lobbying his former employer like the ADB to ensure, they do not touch him again for the rest of his natural life!

33 Responses to “Clumsy threat backfires on Fijian usurper”

  1. Ablaze Says:

    The man is a fucken bully he has no class but all arse.

    Keep the pressure going folks!

    We have been shamed through and through but it will not deter us.

  2. Colin Bishop Says:

    George Nacewa is registered at Massey University as an adult student. What age is he as all the news in Fiji is bleating about this ‘child” that is being punished. If he is an adult then he is aware of his fathers actions and the reason for the refusal. Massey has agreed to allow him to complete his studies extramurally which means he can stay in Fiji and do the last two units by correspondence. He is talking publicly of applying to complete his studies in Australia but to me this smacks of trying to pick another fight as Australia will be obliged to react the same way once it is made public.

  3. Cama Says:

    Somebody can forward the names of these chiefs to the AUSSIE and Kiwi embassy for registration into their black list and together with their family tree.

    I believe this will be effective if the names of all the members of the clan of these chiefs be submitted to them.

  4. Cama Says:

    The chiefs who attend the BNTuragakocokoco.

  5. Ablaze Says:

    George Nacewa is like his Dad no brains nincompoop.

    If he appreciated what NZ could do for him he would speak to his father and make him understand that NZ has every right to do what they want just like his leader Frank the Crank. The only difference is that the sanctions were decided on by an elected govt because of the coup and it is a lesson to the Pig for staging it. He showed know and every youth in Fiji that all decisions are made by criminals that should be locked up in jail.

    Poor shit, how did he get to Massey University in the first place? Because Daddy works for Cranky Frank’s Govt. Well tough titty! In that case it would have to be compliments of the taxpayers hard earned cash, not Daddy’s toil and sweat.

    If Georgie Boy wants to complete his studies, go beg to the NZ Govt and say that you are willing to do anything to complete your studies and if the answer is still NO then come and join us and together we will fight for our democracy, justice for all. When this bull shit govt is out of the way then Georgie Boy can go back to NZ to finish his studies. That simple!

    Life will be good and fair all round because everything will be played on a level playing field.

  6. Colin Bishop Says:

    Ablaze: You refer to him as a youth. My understanding is that to be registered as an adult student at Massey University he has to be over 20 years of age!!

  7. Ablaze Says:

    @ Colin Bishop whatever, don’t bloody care, he and father shouldn’t be cheeky because they support an illegal govt.

    Let them all suffer like us! The only difference is they are wrong so very wrong and we are right because we know that coups are an act of treason!

    If it was me I would be ashamed to say anything let alone create a fuss!

  8. wini Says:

    @Ablaze

    Bravo for your comments above….if Nacewa jnr is an adult and has the uni education he claims to have…then he must know that it is a privilege to be allowed into another country to work and study…not a right! NZ have every right to deny entry to anyone…same as the Fiji Govt and especially the IG have done recently eg Hannah of the Fiji Sun, the NZ journalist detained at ‘Hotel Kennedy’ recently etc.

    He will find the same story if he tries to force the issue in Aussie. It is a country that does not tolerate black fellas pushing their luck. Just ask the Aborigines.

    Someone should tell Nacewa jnr to stop politicising the issue. His rights were not impinged upon. He could complete his degree by distance education…many people have done that. He could even go the India or China to complete his degree…he has the right connexions anyway!

  9. EnufDictatorship Says:

    And who is paying for Joji Nacewa’s NZ uni education again?

    Scholarship by the people’s money or the fajar’s “blood” dollars!!!!???

    Can SV find out, please?

  10. Ablaze Says:

    @ Wini I say these things for today’s youth – we must start pointing out the facts now for them to learn what is right and what is wrong, what is privilege and what is their right, what is respectful and what is disrespectful, what is legal and what is illegal etc. We must not encourage our youth to think, talk or act like these bunch of buffons.

    With all in mind our youth should grow up and become people of principles and take pride in themselves for doing the right thing for our country and its people. Only way I feel we are going to solve the coup culture.

    At the moment I am pissed off because a coup leader and a bunch of unknown chiefs to me have taken it upon themselves to plan my destiny and my country’s future. The most annoying thing is there isn’t a bloody thing I can do about it because I do not have any legal rights.

    My fight is for the youth of today!

  11. ex Fiji Tourist Says:

    It was interesting to read somewhere today that the visa was cancelled last October because junior was skipping lectures.

    I wonder why he fails to highlight this?

  12. freedomfighter Says:

    Bloggers, lest we forgt Nacewa senior’s role in the 2006 coup – He was the one who told Pressie to get rid of Prime Minister Qarase. From Solivakasama.org:

    Part Three

    President’s secretary to Ratu Josefa Iloilo: “Take the bull by the horns and act swiftly”

    By VICTOR LAL

    In particular, Nacewa claimed, Qarase failed to inform the President of the following: (i) of his efforts to enlist the help of foreign military assistance, that an Australian Military task force had been sent to Fiji in the event of Military Intervention and that hey were lying at the fringes or within Fijian territorial waters:

    (ii) that the 16 Pacific Island Forum of Foreign ministers had met to discuss invoking the Biketawa Declaration which authorizes regional intervention into the affairs of Fiji:

    (iii) of discussions that he had with the United Nations Secretary General, Mr Kofi Annan, about events leading to the 5 December takeover, and the effect this may have had on Fiji’s continued role in the UN peacekeeping missions:

    (iv) of the on-going deterioration of civilian and military relations in Fiji, and that the Government of the day had excluded the RFMF from participating in the National Security Council:

    (v) that eight members of the Australian Special Air Force had landed at Nadi Airport and been allowed to enter Fiji without clearing immigration and customs first;

    (vi) that on 28 November 2007 (I presume Nacewa means 2006), British High Commissioner Roger Sykes, United States Ambassador Larry Dinger and Australian High Commissioner Jennifer Rawson met with Deputy Commander Esala Teleni to encourage him to withdraw his support for Commodore Bainimarama, Head of the RFMF, and of their threat to withdraw financial aid to Fiji should there be any military intervention into the government;

    (vii) that on 29 November 2006 he met the Commander at a meeting in Wellington, New Zealand brokered by the New Zealand Minister for Foreign Affairs, Mr Winston Peters and the Prime Minister of New Zealand, Ms Helen Clarke to discuss matters, relating to the governance of Fiji; and

    (viii) that on or about 28 November 2006 the Fiji Police Force made a request to the International Police agency to arrest the Commander.

    Nacewa also disclosed his views on the events leading to Tuesday 5 December 2006. On 1 December 2006, the Press reported that Bainimarama to take over the Government at noon. At the same time, according to Nacewa, the Commander continued to brief the President on the course of action that he was going to take. He (Bainimarama) kept Ratu Iloilo informed of the security situation at the time. “According to the Commander, the PM was not going to give in to his demands, or accept the advice that had been given to him by HE,” said Nacewa.

    It was at this time, on 1 December 2006, that Nacewa decided to act. “I called the Commander and asked, ‘Can you please give me until Monday to try and get the PM to agree to something over the weekend’.” At this time, the Commander was watching the rugby clash with Ratu Joni between the Police and Army, for the Sukuna Bowl at the National Stadium. According to Nacewa, “Over the telephone, the Commander said, “Alright, I will hold off until Monday”. With this agreement in place, Nacewa claimed he informed the President of the status of the matter.

    On Ratu Iloilo’s instruction, Nacewa arranged a series of separate meetings between Ratu Joni and Bainimarama on Saturday morning, and another later that day between Ratu Joni and Qarase at the Vice President’s residence in Sukuna Road for the same day. At the first meeting, according to Nacewa, between Ratu Joni and Bainimarama, the Commander listed out 11 demands that he wanted the PM to agree to before he would withdraw his threat to take over the Government.

    Ratu Joni met with Qarase and presented him with Bainimarama’s demands. “Immediately after the conclusion of the meeting, I was briefed by HEVP who told me that the PM was concerned that the Commander’s demands had increased from 9 to 11. HEVP told me that the PM complained that the Commander could not keep moving the goal posts every time an effort was made to resolve things,” said Nacewa.

    During the briefing, Nacewa claimed that he told Ratu Joni that there would be no more demands. “HEVP told me that the PM suggested that he could agree in principle. However, he also said that he was going to table the matter at the Cabinet Sub-Committee Meeting which was scheduled to take place that night. Their meeting wrapped up at noon, and I was briefed by HEVP immediately after. HEVP and I hoped the PM would take the matter to Cabinet.”

    Unfortunately, according to Nacewa, when he checked with the PM’s Private Secretary to see if the matter was on the Agenda, he said “No, it would be tabled on Tuesday”. “I told him that this was an urgent matter and that it had to be resolved by Monday. If the matter was not resolved by then, the Commander was going to take over,” said Nacewa. By this time, the possibility of a takeover was public knowledge. It had been covered by the Press for a long time now.

    Nacewa claimed that, “This is why there had already been several Australian warships present in Fiji waters in November 2006. The Australians said they were there to evacuate Australian citizens if a coup took place. However, the PM failed to mention this to HE at the relevant time, as he was obliged to under Section 104 of the Constitution”. According to Nacewa, the President’s Office was not ware of the presence of the Australian warships until the Press reported it on Thursday, 30 November 2006. They aid that one of its military helicopters had bounced off one of the ship’s deck while trying to land and crashed into the sea. “The President’s Office only became aware of this after the Attorney General had seen the story on the television and called me about it,” said Nacewa, claiming that “Unfortunately, the PM did not appear to be taking the matter seriously”.

    This may have been, Nacewa suggested, because Bainimarama kept giving Qarase more and more time to resolve things. “However, what the PM didn’t recognise was that on this occasion, it was the Office of the President who had arranged for the Commander to agree to hold off so the weekend meetings could take place. However, HE knew the Commander was serious, so he was keen to work with the PM to resolve things. This is why HE was prepared to meet with the PM at any time.”

    Nothing happened on Sunday. According to Nacewa, “We met with the Commander on Monday morning, and that was when he suggested that HE should call the PM and ask him to resign. That was when we knew for sure that the PM did not take the matter to the Sub-Committee.” Nacewa claimed that they were expecting Qarase to arrive at Government House at 5pm on Monday afternoon. However, “he did not show up”. The President and Nacewa waited until 7pm. “When I rang the PM’s private secretary to find out what was happening, I was told that when the PM arrived at the gate at 5pm, the soldiers told the PM to get out of his car and walk up the drive to Government House. However, the PM was not willing to do this. The PM then had his driver turn their car and drive away. Suspecting some communication breakdown, I called the Aid D Camp to clear things up with the soldiers at the gate, and order them to let the PM in,” said Nacewa.

    He claimed that he phoned Kotobalavu and told him there would be no problem at the gate. According to Nacewa, “I invited the PM, through his private secretary to return to the meeting. However, he said the PM said that because it was getting dark, and because there were soldiers present in the streets of Suva, the PM was reluctant to return. The meeting was then postponed until 9am, the next morning, Tuesday, 5th December”.

    Nacewa advised Ratu Iloilo accordingly. That was at about 7pm. The President retired upstairs, and said, “We will meet again tomorrow at 9am”. I have already outlined the sequence of events of Tuesday 5 December and Ratu Joni’s advice that the President did not have the constitutional powers to sack Qarase because the real conflict existed between the Government and the Military. Ultimately, Nacewa believed that Ratu Iloilo decided to accept Ratu Joni’s advice on Section 109 of the Constitution, and decided that he could not rely on his Executive Authority to dismiss Qarase. “Ultimately, HE was in a situation where he could no longer act, given that the PM had now refused to meet with him at Government House,” said Nacewa.

    It was after this discussion,, according to Nacewa, that Ratu Ioilo instructed him (Nacewa) to advise the Commander that: (i) the PM had refused to meet HE at Government House, as requested by HE; the PM had refused to resign as Prime Minister; (iii) that HE had been advised by HEVP that in the circumstances, he was unable to dismiss the PM under the Constitution; and (iv) the Nation was now in limbo.

    At 11 am, Bainimarama met with Ratu Iloilo at Government House. According to Nacewa, “After being briefed on the matter, the Commander said: ‘If you are not going to sack the Prime Minister, I will take over the executive authority’. I recall HE said in Fijian, ‘vinaka vakalevu’, which means ‘thank you very much’. Nacewa claimed that Bainimarama told Ratu Iloilo that he (Ratu Iloilo) should remain in residence at Government House. “The Commander said that he would hand back Executive Authority as soon as he had done what needed to be done, such as dissolve Parliament, et cetera,” said Naceva. The Commander then took control of the Government and appointed Jona Senilagakali as Caretaker Prime Minister, who advised Bainimarama to dissolve Parliament.

    After Bainimarama assumed power, Nacewa reported to him in the same manner that he had previously reported to Ratu Iloilo. By this time, the Government was being handled by the Military Council. On 4 January 2007, Bainimarama went to Ratu Iloilo’s office and handed back executive authority to him. According to Nacewa, “the Commander also presented HE with the traditional whales tooth, as part of the handing back ceremony. HE said that he had supported the Commander’s actions which he said were necessary to resolve the impasse of 5 December 2006 and to ensure the preservation of the 1997 Constitution”.

    Nacewa claimed that, “HE said that the Commander’s actions of 5 December 2007 (20006) were needed at the time, and that this is why he was willing to grant both criminal and civil immunity to the Commander and all other officers of the Republic of Fiji Military Forces”. At the same time, Nacewa continued, and with the return of civilian rule, “We started to receive the names of the new Ministers. Our job was to see if they would accept their appointments and get them ready for the swearing in ceremony”.

    He claimed that, “Since the appointment of the Interim Government, it appeared at first that the indigenous Fijians did not accept the Military Government at the time, while the Indo-Fijian did”. However, now days, Nacewa claimed, “I believe there is a silent majority of Fijian people who support the Interim Government. This, I think, is consistent with Fijian culture. Now days, Fijian people just want to move on, they realize that it is better this way, rather than trying to turn the clock back”.

    In his affidavit of 18 September 2007, Qarase refuted Nacewa’s affidavit, and claimed that the President knew he had no legal, constitutional or moral authority to give such authorization for the takeover of government, and had been advised in that vein by the Vice President Ratu Joni Madraiwiwi.

  13. freedomfighter Says:

    Sorry, folks – here is the first part – This Rupeni Nacewa was behaving like he WAS the President of Fiji, and now he is claiming that he is just a “villager” who happens to be working in the Pressie’s office – Bullshit, you coup traitor:

    Part Three

    President’s secretary to Ratu Josefa Iloilo: “Take the bull by the horns and act swiftly”

    By VICTOR LAL

    On the morning of 5 December 2006 the President Ratu Josefa Iloilo arrived at his office at about 8.30am. At the same time, his official secretary Rupeni Nacewa, received a message from his secretary, to call the Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase on his mobile telephone. Nacewa, according to his sworn affidavit of 30 August 2007, claimed that Qarase wanted to know the purpose of the meeting.

    “I told him that HE (His Excellency) wanted to know why he had not taken the matter to the Cabinet-Sub-committee on Saturday night, 2 December 2006. He also wanted to know what had happened since the Saturday 2 December 2006 meeting. I also told the PM that HE wanted to discuss how they might be able to avoid a coup d’etat, and that HE was going to ask him to resign. Unfortunately, the PM said there was no point for him to attend as he was not going to agree to the Commander’s proposals. The PM told me to advise the Commander to carry out his coup threat and if I may quote his own words: Let him carry out the coup if he wants to.”

    According to Nacewa, after he reported this to Ratu Iloio, the President wanted to know what he could do under the 1997 Constitution. Nacewa advised the following: “I advised HE that in the circumstances, he could not rely on section 109 of the Constitution and dismiss the PM. I advised HE that he would have to find some other way of relying on his Executive power to justify dismissing the Prime Minister. Once done, HE could appoint a Caretaker Prime Minister to advise HE to dissolve parliament. I advised that this course of action would be accepted by the international community and members of the public as opposed to a Military Coup de tat. I advised HE to take the bull by the horns and act swiftly. If the SDL government wish to take HE to court then that would be their choice, and we will cross that bridge when we come to it.”

    However, the President also turned to Captain Viliame Draunibaka, the ADC, and asked him if the Vice President Ratu Joni Madraiwiwi was available. The ADC told Ratu Joni that the President wanted to see him about Qarase’s refusal to meet him (the President), his refusal to resign and the legal implication of invoking section 109 of the Constitution. According to Nacewa’s affidavit, Ratu Joni advised the President that under the Constitution Ratu Iloilo did not have the authority to sack Qarase, other than for what is prescribed in the section of the 1997 Constitution. Ratu Joni further advised that Ratu Iloilo could not use the Doctrine of Necessity as the reason or basis for sacking Qarase, because the real conflict existed between the Government and the Military. According to Nacewa, at this time the President had two conflicting opinions on how he could lawfully dismiss the PM. It is not clear whether Nacewa was referring to his own opinion or that of another person vis a vis that of the Vice-President. We will return to Nacewa’s affidavit in due course.

    In his sworn affidavit of 18 September 2007 the deposed Prime Minister Qarase asserted that, “Nothing contained in the Nacewa Affidavit could be said or understood to justify the First and Second Defendants’ unlawful, illegal and unconstitutional acts in overthrowing my elected multi-party government and dissolving Parliament elected by the people of Fiji as and when they did between 4th and 5 December 2006 as I have explained herein”. I will be returning to Qarase’s affidavit later on but its reminding ourselves from the previous instalment that Qarase also stated that he had received a phone call on 28 August 2007, in which a person who allegedly identified himself as calling from the RFMF had threatened that he (Qarase) would be killed on arrival, if he returned from his enforced “internal exile” on Mavana to Suva.

    Nacewa has held the position of Official Secretary to the President since 2004. His role, according to his affidavit, is to advise Ratu Iloilo on matters of national interest and importance. Therefore, access to the President is in all instances, through him. During the events leading to 5 December 2006, he stated that he was present at all meetings between the President, Commodore Frank Bainimarama and deposed Prime Minister Qarase. There was only one occasion in mid November 2006 when Qarase, according to Nacewa, met with the President alone. “This was a 15 minute meeting when the PM spoke to HE about disciplinary action being taken against the Commander. Although I was not present at this meeting, I know that this is what they were talking about because immediately after the meeting, my office received a letter from the Minister for Home Affairs to HE recommending that disciplinary action be taken against the Commander,” said Nacewa.

    He than outlined the relations between Government and the Military. From late October through to 5 December 2006 relations between the PM and the Commander were strained. Often, Nacewa said, the media reported on their differences, creating what was known as the “War of Words” between them. The media often played the Prime Minister against the Commander. “Ultimately,” he said, “this strained relations between them which ultimately worried HE”. Finally, the President felt that he would have to call Qarase and give him an opportunity to ventilate the issues he had with Bainimarama.

    Although Qarase was the elected leader, Nacewa claimed, there was concern that if the Commander did not take him to task, there would be no one else in Fiji with the ability or influence to ensure that the Governments policies continued to be in the best interests of the people of Fiji. He pointed out that Qarase and Bainimarama clashed on the two draft Bills, the Reconciliation and Unity Bill, and the Qoliqoli Bill. These Bills were unpopular with the Commander, as well as many minority groups such as Non-Governmental Organisations, who protested against the Government for trying to push these Bills through Parliament.

    According to Nacewa, “The consensus of the Military, and other people who were opposed to the Bills, was that the Government should shelve them until after the General Election. Many people believed the Government should concentrate on more important issues, such as the economy of the country”. However, for some reason, Qarase wanted to push these controversial Bills’ through Parliament, said Nacewa, adding, “Unfortunately, it seemed that the continued disagreement between the PM and the Commander over this issue was getting out of hand”.

    Finally, the Commander came to the verge of threatening the PM with a takeover. Naceva explained: “In reply, HE was informed by the Commander that the PM had excluded him from the National Security Council, which left only the Commissioner of Police to advise the Government on the security of the country. For these reasons, HE saw fit to call the PM and schedule a meeting with him for 18 June 2005.”

    According to Nacewa, at this meeting, Qarase was in Lau. “I called his CEO, Jioji Kotobalavu and told him that HE wanted to see the PM as soon as he arrived back in Suva. I was told that the PM would arrive back in Suva that afternoon, so I said that HE would meet with him once he returned. The PM attended the meeting with HE and HEVP (Vice President) as scheduled. At this meeting, according to Nacewa, Ratu Iloilo asked Qarase if he would hold the RTU Bill, and if the Qoliqoli Bill could be withdrawn, as they had both attracted much criticism from various Fijian communities. The President also encouraged more constructive dialogue between himself and the Commander.

    Nacewa claimed that the President told Qarase that he believed if the Bills were not withdrawn, “the Commander was serious about taking control of the Government”. However, “HE and HEVP also said that this was not to be taken by the PM as a desire by them to see the Government’s autonomy come under threat, although they were worried what might happen if the Nation was to experience another uneventful crisis”. He said both Ratu Iloilo and Ratu Joni reiterated their concern for what might happen if the bills were passed was a priority to maintaining the status quo of the country, and should not be construed as an attempt by them to derail the Government’s aspirations.

    It was at this stage, Nacewa claimed, that Qarase said the Government was unable to work with the continued interruption of the Commander, although “he (Qarase) appeared to accept their Excellencies advice”. Meanwhile, Nacewa said, the “War of Words” over the two Bills continued between Qarase and Bainimarama. “This was because the PM persisted with the draft Bills. It became clear that the PM did not accept HE’s advice,” said Nacewa, continuing, “Despite this, HE renewed his guidance to the PM and suggested that he should try to uphold a constructive dialogue with the Commander, and try to resolve the issue”.

    However, Nacewa felt, Qarase did not appear to be interested in taking this course, and it because obvious to Ratu Iloilo that Qarase was “not making an effort to resolve or discuss the matter with the Commander”. According to Nacewa, “From the President’s Office, it was clear to us that the Commander did not want to conduct a Coup, and this is why he remained willing to give the PM more time to withdraw the Bills and see reality”. “The Commander was keen to give the PM an opportunity to rectify the crisis, while he continued to tell the Press that he was going to take over the Government if the two controversial Bills were not withdrawn,” said Nacewa.

    Nacewa than commented upon the point that Qarase had failed to keep the President informed. Ratu Iloilo received a Cabinet Brief from Qarase after each Cabinet meeting. This was the official channel of information by which the Prime Minister was to keep the President informed about issues relating to the governance of Fiji. Nacewa attached to his affidavit copies of Cabinet briefs for the President. This is the only channel of communication between the PM and the President. According to Nacewa, the Cabinet Briefs confirmed that Qarase failed to keep Ratu Iloilo informed of the various other issues that were clearly affecting the governance of Fiji at the time.

    In particular, Nacewa claimed, Qarase failed to inform the President of the following: (i) of his efforts to enlist the help of foreign military assistance, that an Australian Military task force had been sent to Fiji in the event of Military Intervention and that hey were lying at the fringes or within Fijian territorial waters:

    (ii) that the 16 Pacific Island Forum of Foreign ministers had met to discuss invoking the Biketawa Declaration which authorizes regional intervention into the affairs of Fiji:

    (iii) of discussions that he had with the United Nations Secretary General, Mr Kofi Annan, about events leading to the 5 December takeover, and the effect this may have had on Fiji’s continued role in the UN peacekeeping missions:

    (iv) of the on-going deterioration of civilian and military relations in Fiji, and that the Government of the day had excluded the RFMF from participating in the National Security Council:

    (v) that eight members of the Australian Special Air Force had landed at Nadi Airport and been allowed to enter Fiji without clearing immigration and customs first;

    (vi) that on 28 November 2007 (I presume Nacewa means 2006), British High Commissioner Roger Sykes, United States Ambassador Larry Dinger and Australian High Commissioner Jennifer Rawson met with Deputy Commander Esala Teleni to encourage him to withdraw his support for Commodore Bainimarama, Head of the RFMF, and of their threat to withdraw financial aid to Fiji should there be any military intervention into the government;

    (vii) that on 29 November 2006 he met the Commander at a meeting in Wellington, New Zealand brokered by the New Zealand Minister for Foreign Affairs, Mr Winston Peters and the Prime Minister of New Zealand, Ms Helen Clarke to discuss matters, relating to the governance of Fiji; and

    (viii) that on or about 28 November 2006 the Fiji Police Force made a request to the International Police agency to arrest the Commander.

    Nacewa also disclosed his views on the events leading to Tuesday 5 December 2006. On 1 December 2006, the Press reported that Bainimarama to take over the Government at noon. At the same time, according to Nacewa, the Commander continued to brief the President on the course of action that he was going to take. He (Bainimarama) kept Ratu Iloilo informed of the security situation at the time. “According to the Commander, the PM was not going to give in to his demands, or accept the advice that had been given to him by HE,” said Nacewa.

    It was at this time, on 1 December 2006, that Nacewa decided to act. “I called the Commander and asked, ‘Can you please give me until Monday to try and get the PM to agree to something over the weekend’.” At this time, the Commander was watching the rugby clash with Ratu Joni between the Police and Army, for the Sukuna Bowl at the National Stadium. According to Nacewa, “Over the telephone, the Commander said, “Alright, I will hold off until Monday”. With this agreement in place, Nacewa claimed he informed the President of the status of the matter.

    On Ratu Iloilo’s instruction, Nacewa arranged a series of separate meetings between Ratu Joni and Bainimarama on Saturday morning, and another later that day between Ratu Joni and Qarase at the Vice President’s residence in Sukuna Road for the same day. At the first meeting, according to Nacewa, between Ratu Joni and Bainimarama, the Commander listed out 11 demands that he wanted the PM to agree to before he would withdraw his threat to take over the Government.

    Ratu Joni met with Qarase and presented him with Bainimarama’s demands. “Immediately after the conclusion of the meeting, I was briefed by HEVP who told me that the PM was concerned that the Commander’s demands had increased from 9 to 11. HEVP told me that the PM complained that the Commander could not keep moving the goal posts every time an effort was made to resolve things,” said Nacewa.

    During the briefing, Nacewa claimed that he told Ratu Joni that there would be no more demands. “HEVP told me that the PM suggested that he could agree in principle. However, he also said that he was going to table the matter at the Cabinet Sub-Committee Meeting which was scheduled to take place that night. Their meeting wrapped up at noon, and I was briefed by HEVP immediately after. HEVP and I hoped the PM would take the matter to Cabinet.”

    Unfortunately, according to Nacewa, when he checked with the PM’s Private Secretary to see if the matter was on the Agenda, he said “No, it would be tabled on Tuesday”. “I told him that this was an urgent matter and that it had to be resolved by Monday. If the matter was not resolved by then, the Commander was going to take over,” said Nacewa. By this time, the possibility of a takeover was public knowledge. It had been covered by the Press for a long time now.

    Nacewa claimed that, “This is why there had already been several Australian warships present in Fiji waters in November 2006. The Australians said they were there to evacuate Australian citizens if a coup took place. However, the PM failed to mention this to HE at the relevant time, as he was obliged to under Section 104 of the Constitution”. According to Nacewa, the President’s Office was not ware of the presence of the Australian warships until the Press reported it on Thursday, 30 November 2006. They aid that one of its military helicopters had bounced off one of the ship’s deck while trying to land and crashed into the sea. “The President’s Office only became aware of this after the Attorney General had seen the story on the television and called me about it,” said Nacewa, claiming that “Unfortunately, the PM did not appear to be taking the matter seriously”.

    This may have been, Nacewa suggested, because Bainimarama kept giving Qarase more and more time to resolve things. “However, what the PM didn’t recognise was that on this occasion, it was the Office of the President who had arranged for the Commander to agree to hold off so the weekend meetings could take place. However, HE knew the Commander was serious, so he was keen to work with the PM to resolve things. This is why HE was prepared to meet with the PM at any time.”

    Nothing happened on Sunday. According to Nacewa, “We met with the Commander on Monday morning, and that was when he suggested that HE should call the PM and ask him to resign. That was when we knew for sure that the PM did not take the matter to the Sub-Committee.” Nacewa claimed that they were expecting Qarase to arrive at Government House at 5pm on Monday afternoon. However, “he did not show up”. The President and Nacewa waited until 7pm. “When I rang the PM’s private secretary to find out what was happening, I was told that when the PM arrived at the gate at 5pm, the soldiers told the PM to get out of his car and walk up the drive to Government House. However, the PM was not willing to do this. The PM then had his driver turn their car and drive away. Suspecting some communication breakdown, I called the Aid D Camp to clear things up with the soldiers at the gate, and order them to let the PM in,” said Nacewa.

    He claimed that he phoned Kotobalavu and told him there would be no problem at the gate. According to Nacewa, “I invited the PM, through his private secretary to return to the meeting. However, he said the PM said that because it was getting dark, and because there were soldiers present in the streets of Suva, the PM was reluctant to return. The meeting was then postponed until 9am, the next morning, Tuesday, 5th December”.

    Nacewa advised Ratu Iloilo accordingly. That was at about 7pm. The President retired upstairs, and said, “We will meet again tomorrow at 9am”. I have already outlined the sequence of events of Tuesday 5 December and Ratu Joni’s advice that the President did not have the constitutional powers to sack Qarase because the real conflict existed between the Government and the Military. Ultimately, Nacewa believed that Ratu Iloilo decided to accept Ratu Joni’s advice on Section 109 of the Constitution, and decided that he could not rely on his Executive Authority to dismiss Qarase. “Ultimately, HE was in a situation where he could no longer act, given that the PM had now refused to meet with him at Government House,” said Nacewa.

    It was after this discussion,, according to Nacewa, that Ratu Ioilo instructed him (Nacewa) to advise the Commander that: (i) the PM had refused to meet HE at Government House, as requested by HE; the PM had refused to resign as Prime Minister; (iii) that HE had been advised by HEVP that in the circumstances, he was unable to dismiss the PM under the Constitution; and (iv) the Nation was now in limbo.

    At 11 am, Bainimarama met with Ratu Iloilo at Government House. According to Nacewa, “After being briefed on the matter, the Commander said: ‘If you are not going to sack the Prime Minister, I will take over the executive authority’. I recall HE said in Fijian, ‘vinaka vakalevu’, which means ‘thank you very much’. Nacewa claimed that Bainimarama told Ratu Iloilo that he (Ratu Iloilo) should remain in residence at Government House. “The Commander said that he would hand back Executive Authority as soon as he had done what needed to be done, such as dissolve Parliament, et cetera,” said Nacewa. The Commander then took control of the Government and appointed Jona Senilagakali as Caretaker Prime Minister, who advised Bainimarama to dissolve Parliament.

    After Bainimarama assumed power, Nacewa reported to him in the same manner that he had previously reported to Ratu Iloilo. By this time, the Government was being handled by the Military Council. On 4 January 2007, Bainimarama went to Ratu Iloilo’s office and handed back executive authority to him. According to Nacewa, “the Commander also presented HE with the traditional whales tooth, as part of the handing back ceremony. HE said that he had supported the Commander’s actions which he said were necessary to resolve the impasse of 5 December 2006 and to ensure the preservation of the 1997 Constitution”.

    Nacewa claimed that, “HE said that the Commander’s actions of 5 December 2007 (20006) were needed at the time, and that this is why he was willing to grant both criminal and civil immunity to the Commander and all other officers of the Republic of Fiji Military Forces”. At the same time, Nacewa continued, and with the return of civilian rule, “We started to receive the names of the new Ministers. Our job was to see if they would accept their appointments and get them ready for the swearing in ceremony”.

    He claimed that, “Since the appointment of the Interim Government, it appeared at first that the indigenous Fijians did not accept the Military Government at the time, while the Indo-Fijian did”. However, now days, Nacewa claimed, “I believe there is a silent majority of Fijian people who support the Interim Government. This, I think, is consistent with Fijian culture. Now days, Fijian people just want to move on, they realize that it is better this way, rather than trying to turn the clock back”.

    In his affidavit of 18 September 2007, Qarase refuted Nacewa’s affidavit, and claimed that the President knew he had no legal, constitutional or moral authority to give such authorization for the takeover of government, and had been advised in that vein by the Vice President Ratu Joni Madraiwiwi.

  14. ex Fiji Tourist Says:

    Thank you Freedom Fighter for reviving those posts by Victor.

    Nacewa is a coupster who should be hung by the neck until dead.

  15. Mark Manning Says:

    I think we should have a whip around and buy them all a one way ticket on a slow boat to China !
    Frank can be the commander of the vessel , Teline the 1st. mate , Chaudhry the cook , hairy yarze the head semen !

  16. Mark Manning Says:

    I mean head seaman !

  17. Mark Manning Says:

    No , hang on , I was right the 1st. time !

  18. Colin Bishop Says:

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/dominionpost/4796269a6483.htmls

    This Editorial in the Dominion Times is worth reading on the subject.

  19. Colin Bishop Says:

    Sorry try this

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/dominionpost/4796269a6483.html

  20. ex Fiji Tourist Says:

    Thanks Colin

    I’ll post below the thrust of the editorial.

    “””Fiji’s military leaders say George Nacewa is a victim of heavy-handed New Zealand diplomacy.

    The Dominion Post writes.

    He is not.

    He is a victim of the military coup that ousted Fiji’s lawfully elected government in December 2006.

    Mr Nacewa has not had his property unlawfully searched. He has not been intimidated by Fiji’s security forces. Nor has he been unlawfully detained, beaten or killed like some opponents of Commodore Voreqe Bainimarama’s regime.
    But he has been denied the opportunity to finish the degree because his father is an aide to Fijian President Josefa Iloilo. ( AND A COUPSTER )

    The fault lies not with New Zealand for refusing to admit members of the military, senior government officials and their close relatives, but Commodore Bainimarama and those who helped him to overthrow Fiji’s lawfully elected government.

    The coup has damaged Fiji’s reputation, damaged its economy and weakened the institutions that should underpin a democracy.

    Instead of huffing and puffing and threatening to expel New Zealand’s acting high commissioner if Mr Nacewa is not given a visa, the commodore should take a deep breath and consider whether the course he has embarked upon has any prospect of success.

    Within Fiji he is the strongman whose word is law. Outside it, he is just another petulant dictator whose threats are recognised for the empty bluster that they are.

    But the commodore should be under no illusions. Fiji has a lot more to lose by antagonising its friends and neighbours than they do. He has started his country down the path Robert Mugabe has taken Zimbabwe. It is a path that leads to social and economic disaster. He should reverse direction before it is too late.

  21. ex Fiji Tourist Says:

    Post a Comment
    2 Comment(s)

    I just returned from Fiji and am annoyed with the lack of understanding NZ media have for the constitutional process in Fiji. Commodore Bainimarama is not refusing to accept the will of the Fijian people, as you maintain in your Editorial. Instead, he put a process of public consultation in place, where all Fijians can read and comment on the draft People’s Charter, which is designed to pave the way for democratic elections. The people have spoken and a feedback summary has been presented to the Fijian president. According to an article in the Fiji Times, the result was 92% of adults over 18 are in support of the Peoples Charter. Fiji sure doesn’t need lecturing in democracy from a provincial newspaper in NZ.
    Reply to this post
    #1 Posted by Ulli Weissbach — 10:11 AM | Friday , 19 December 2008

    In response to #1
    Absolute rubbish. The Charter Document that has been produced by the Military Goverment would require the Constitution to be illegially changed and the Military to be put above future Goverments with the right to interfere at any time. Also a full amnesty for all rights abuses and actions of all soldiers during the coup and backdated to 2000 to protect the previous actions of the Commander that were under Police investigations. The Charter Numbers include 17 year old children who were forced to sign documents by Police Officers without reading them. It has been reported in local newspapers that people were asked to sign the forms without reading them in the presence of Military Officers. The figures of acceptance has now dropped to the area of 60%. The level of fear in Fiji at the moment means people are too scared not to sign when confronted by the military.
    Elections are the answer and I fully aprove New Zealands actions.
    Reply to this post
    #2 Posted by Colin Bishop — 10:37 AM | Friday , 19 December 2008

  22. ex Fiji Tourist Says:

    Thanks Colin for the quick response to the garbage posted by the green goon above.

  23. Kavala Bay Says:

    Set sara ga nai talanoa mai Government Building! Freedom fighter, please reveal more to us. Just cant wait to read part 4,5,6,7….Mai! Biuta mada me ra kune kece!

  24. freedomfighter Says:

    Go to solivakasama.org and its all there on pdf form by Victor

  25. freedomfighter Says:

    Kavala Bay, click below:

    http://solivakasama.org/clients_19.html

  26. Adi Kaila Says:

    Well there you go idiocy prevails with voreqe bhai – I just have to say Thank You God for revealing to Fiji and the rest of the world that imbeciles like voreqe bhai and ALL of his ig coupsters are truly a bunch of worthless human beings who deserve all of the hatred felt against them.

    Thank You Almighty God for revealing the inadquecies of these people that are not fit to clean anyones toilet let alone try to clean up corruption that did not exist with the legally elected SDL government & have the gall to think they can lead the beloved Nation of Fiji.

    The revelation of the innate stupidity of voreqe bhai & the ig coupsters is an invaluable lesson for us all never to forget and to recognise forever that we must all abide by the laws defined by our constitution and not allow delusional sociopaths to usurp our basic rights because of imagined slights.

    All of the ig coupsters have been at some time given the opportunity to succeed in their chosen field but because of their own lack of basic intelligence or plain old malua fever have not progressed & so of course overlooked for better positions wherever. All of their lives they’ve wanted to be the winner but lucked out because there was always someone better than them, but they didn’t take the steps to improve themselves or their lot, instead blaming all and sundry for their failures.

    Never chosen for the First XV at school or was never good enough to compete in the Inter School Games – athletics, swimming, soccer or basketball. Were never able to pass an exam without a couple of attempts or just scraping through but without the required marks to go further. Given portfolios when their party won election or executed a coup but not utilising the brains of that particular department to learn and try to become an expert in that field, yet always finding an excuse why they didn’t make the grade, Pathetic really!

    Here they all are gathered together again – take Isoa Gavidi, how many times has he been an ambassador for Fiji yet his English has not improved at all, nor has his wifes. I ask – how was he chosen to be an ambassador in the first place?

    Filipe Bole – he has worked in the Education Ministry for so long – from the sixties PUHLEEEESE and worked for the government of the day overseas you’d think he would have, with all the opportunities have a real solution on how to improve the standards of education or to make the availability of education to every child in Fiji a reality. No he’s still mouthing psycho babble from some self help book – bloody stupid old fart.

    I could go on and on but we all know who they are & If they had not executed the 5.12.06 coup their inadequacies would never have been broadcast.

    ALWAYS THE BRIDESMAID NEVER THE BRIDE.

    Nacewa snr was implicit in the 5.12.06 Coup, career civil servant or not he is the blackguard more involved than he would like us all to think.

    Such a self important shit! He would rather compromise his sons education than step down from his contemptible job as the morally reprehensible permanent secretary to the president.

    Yep rups – we’ve got your number – banging the presidents wife and helping to bang up the Nation. Ride the ig gravy train and the presidents wife while you can, the consequences when you try to disengage will be your ultimate nightmare.

    Remember rups and the rest of the ig coupsters – sins of the fathers are visited on the sons.

    Dou sa velavela taucoko.

  27. Ablaze Says:

    Vinaka Adi Kaila – keep it coming!

  28. lutu Says:

    Voreqe you bavulu, please step aside and give our educated i Taukei to run an elected Government. We have well educated i Taukei in the thousands who could managed our government better than you, so please step aside,go home to Kiuva and lai tei na via kei na tudai Mana.

  29. Damudamu Says:

    Which Law School did Nacewa graduate from – sounds like a wanna bee lawyer with his BS advice to the useless Pres! Not once do I read that as The Commander In Chief, he orders Mad Voreqe to cease, and desist from continuing to threaten the government of the day – basically act as A CIC and tell the Commander to sit down and shut up!!!!!

  30. Wailei Says:

    George Nacewa sound like a little boci.. Get Over it! What makes him special anyway? These are the kinds of rich kids who are used to getting their own way! Too bad.. Life’s a Bitch ain’t it?

  31. Keep The Faith Says:

    Nacewa senior is, was and continues to be an opportunistic con-man who saw the coup of 6/12 as major cash-in time.

    Even @ JOTJ, we picked him out very early on:

    http://jokesonthejunta.blogspot.com/2007/05/best-laid-plansyada-yada-yada.html

  32. Malekata Ravisa Says:

    I thank God that we have some brave souls in Foreign Affairs who are trying to talk some sense into their Minister. Na mataqali katakata vaka kuro kava sa ra ga mai na wavu e cakava tu ‘qo o VB.

  33. Damudamu Says:

    I say shoot the little insignificant fucker!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: