Frank: be careful who you listen to!

That the hastily and secretly convened “independent investigation” of the CHODOPU$$’s tax affairs was a farce and a total sham is beyond doubt.

The illegal interim Attorney-General Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum may well trumpet that CHODOPU$$ has been “cleared” because “the tax assessment by FIRCA with respect to Mr Chaudhry between 2000 and 2006 was carried out in accordance with the Tax Act and other relevant tax laws in Fiji.”

But what does that mean? It means next to nothing. All it proves was that a highly selective and absurdly limited brief was given to a reputable investigative team, which then dutifully did an audit of a particular FIRCA file (or set of files) and then ticked all the right boxes.

It was a cynical/ unconvincing and contrived piece of bureaucratic ballyhoo. It is the sort of crude pea and thimble stunt that we have come to expect from this regime. Another day, another farce! It’s what the “investigators” did NOT investigate that makes this latest episode a complete farce.

What about the very well documented large amounts of cash flowing into and between CHODOPU$$’s five Sydney bank accounts? Is this money still in the CHODOPU$$’s name? If not, can he provide receipts (and witnesses) to prove where it ended up and that it was used legally and properlyThat’s what the people of Fiji have a right to know because that’s what this is really all about, and it’s what has made CHODOPU$$’s lawyers threaten the Fiji Times with a one billion dollar lawsuit. Instead, the people of Fiji get fed a load of self-serving, superficial and irrelevant garbage ladled out by Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum at a press conference.

But don’t get us wrong. We are neither angered nor surprised by the whole charade. In fact, we are quite chuffed to have witnessed an act of such mind-boggling stupidity that it can only serve to erode whatever little support the illegal regime might have in Fiji today. And we are fascinated by the way in which the playing out of this episode has demonstrated so clearly that the illegal regime is starting to fall apart at the seams. No, we’re not being overly optimistic. Just consider the way in which our illegal, self-appointed rulers wrong-footed themselves at every turn.

It’s clear they cannot even communicate effectively between themselves. And it’s also clear that the real axis of power has shifted from Bainimarama and his military colleagues to CHODOPU$$ and the illegal interim attorney-general.

The chain of command, the unity and the shared sense of purpose that Bainimarama tried so hard to demonstrate in the days immediately after the coup have completely disappeared. Instead, what you have is what you see – a hopeless concoction of cliques and individuals with differing agendas. For example, after the Fiji Times did such a thorough job of documenting the CHODOPU$$’s unseemly wealth and relaxed attitude to taxation matters, there was a call by the military council for CHODOPU$$ to do the right thing and step aside to enable a full, independent and open investigation (a move that we thought, under all the circumstances, to be the most sensible option open to any government, even an illegal one).

But the way in which this carefully considered advice caused Bainimarama to fly into a sudden, almost manic episode of denial showed just how stupid he can be when he really puts his mind to it. He made himself look even more ridiculous (if that was possible) by appointing himself as the one and only military spokesperson. Or, as we saw it, he pulled the last tooth out of what was already looking like a toothless tiger.

In the meantime/ the illegal interim attorney-general, presumably with Bainimarama’s agreement, implemented his crude plan to whitewash the whole affair. But, as we have all seen, in terms of public perception, the whitewash attempt spectacularly back-fired. And it demonstrates for all to see that Bainimarama does not heed good advice when he gets it. It appears he only listens to whatever line the CHODOPU$$ and the CHODOPU$$’s eager apprentice, Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum, choose to feed him.

Will Bainimarama now learn from this experience and seeker wiser, less self- interested counsel in the future? We don’t think so.

If Bainimarama has proved anything about his behavioural patterns it’s that when it comes to doing anything that might suggest he was wrong, he just won’t go there.

To sum up, we all knew after Bainimarama’s reckless and unlawful actions on 5 December 2006 that Fiji was not going to be the same again for as long as it took for Bainimarama’s illegal and unconstitutional experiment to inevitably fail. Now we can see that the much anticipated inevitability, that process of final and fatal disintegration, is well and truly starting to happen. Any guesses on how long it will take?

Fiji Democracy Now

Advertisements

12 Responses to “Frank: be careful who you listen to!”

  1. Vakatakilai Says:

    Bainimarama is not in a comfortable position it seems.

    He is so entangled in the web that both Chaudhary the iAG and his other Indian masters have weaved him in that he cannot escape. The only exits available to him will only expose the truth about what he has put the whole nation in for the last 15 months.

    It seems that not only Bai is under locks; the ever so threatening military council has been quiet now for some time. They have tried to stand straight up lately but have been ordered to keep quiet in case they say something wrong and the public will know of their misery.

    It may be an idea to check out each of their bank accounts as this may paint us a true picture of why things are happening and no one is brave enough amongst them to speak out.

    Our Indian brothers and sisters in the midst of all this sham are no fools and they know real well how to keep the boys who have the guns muted. They will use whatever is available to them to complete their mission.

    Further, it should be noted too that looking at what is happening currently, they are beginning to realise too that they may not be able to accomplish what they originally set out to achieve and may be closely looking at an exit strategy to save themselves. Remember they are highly educated, in positions of power, very cunning, cruel and unsympathetic and will do everything to save themselves from the failed mission they are in.

    They see Nata, Silatolu and the 2000 coup convict in their uniforms and have decided that that is not for them, so a much more clever strategy will have already been in place for them.

  2. Soul of Fiji Says:

    Should put them in the same prison block and maybe the same cell as Speight, Silatolu, Nata etc. I guesse the first person to cry like a baby will be the commander

  3. Mark Manning Says:

    Time to start sourcing young intellectual Fijians , Indian and Indigenous who have openly opposed this coup and previous ones , to stand for elections . I figure , they are the ones who would be most motivated to make sure Democracy works for their country . Also , maybe should downsize or abolish the Military !

  4. Beranaliva Says:

    Totally agree with you there Mark Manning.
    We could do with young, intellectual visions to take this country forward.
    Time have changed and Fiji needs new ideas and there are a lot of good candidates out there. Maybe the country will sober up from these coup hangovers.
    NEW FIJI FOR A BETTER FIJI!!!
    Power to the People!

  5. Budhau Says:

    The author wrote, “And it’s also clear that the real axis of power has shifted from Bainimarama and his military colleagues to CHODOPU$$ and the illegal interim attorney-general.”

    I think you have to give something more concrete to reinforce your argument about the shift.

    Chaudary is there as ling as the IG feels that he has something positive to conrebute to their regime. The day the perceived advantages of having Chaudary in the IG starts to outweigh his advantages, that is the day the military council and Bainimarama will let him go. Being the guy that Chaudary is – he might realize that earlier and exit before he is fired.

    The author wrote, “Bainimarama’s illegal and unconstitutional experiment to inevitably fail. Now we can see that the much anticipated inevitability, that process of final and fatal disintegration, is well and truly starting to happen. Any guesses on how long it will take?”

    The author of the above piece is correct that things are falling apart. The question is not how long, the more important question is whether these guy will go down fighting. If we do not give them amnesty and a way out – which will be done by negotiations – these guys will go down fighting and they make take down the country, the economy etc with them.

    Also factor in the FLP/New Alliance/Catholic etc coalition in the next election, they might not let Chaudary go for that reason also – otherwise what will happen to the political careers of the Epeli boys.

  6. natewaprince Says:

    It is so obvious that the regime has something to hide when the poofy AG furiously stated that the tax saga was cleared by the enquiry team,the case ws over and they would not comment any further on it.

    This from a pot smoking faggot who is acting so gung-ho when he realises the power he wields with the goons at his beck and call.

    His security detail is the most boi dada of all,(kani ucu da e ra cakava tiko vei bogi).Wailei,e dua ga e mai gaga.

  7. Fiji Democracy Now Says:

    We think “Budhau” models himself on the Nazi propagandist, William Joyce, otherwise known as “Lord Haw Haw.” His famous tactic was to pretend one moment he was one of the guys by going along with what the Allies were saying, and then driving home the Nazi line the next.

    For example: in response to our article above “Budhau” says we are correct in saying that the illegal regime is falling apart but not before suggesting that we had not furnished proof of our claim that the axis of power had shifted. Well, sorry, we most certainly did — by citing the fact that Bainimarama didn’t listen to the Military Council and chose instead to follow the illegal interim attorney- general’s strategy for a staged whitewash.

    Like Lord Haw Haw/ Budhau’s strategy is to duck and weave, to ebb and flow, to hedge his bets, to try to appear credible while selling the opposite line.

    For example, in response to Soli’s posting about Frank’s inferiority complex, Budhau says: “Listen guys – the problem that we have in Fiji is not going to be settled in a court of law. It is a political/social problem.”

    In other words: Forget the rule of law (because the rule of law is anathema to the illegal regime and its supporters, such as “Budhau.” Since illegally seizing power the regime has been doing its best to compromise the judiciary and manipulate the law by pulling stunts like the sham whitewash of the millionaire Labour Party Leader and famed benefactor of the poor, CHODOPU$$).

    Then he goes on to say: “Instead of dealing with FB and Chaudary’s psychological issues – why don’t we do a brainstorming in here – to figure out where we go from here. The March was one idea – got anything else?”

    In other words: Stop discrediting key figures in the regime (the truth hurts!) and instead do something stupid like bringing on a confrontation (for example, a march), which will give Bainimarama and CHODOPU$$ the excuse they desperately need to clamp down and then entrench their regime.

    Elsewhere on this site, “Budhau” talks about Bainimarama “negotiating” an end to his illegal regime. That’s another nonsense line from Budhau. Everyone knows that Bainimarama doesn’t negotiate. He proved that emphatically in the months leading up to his coup.

    So, there is no reason why anyone should take “Budhau” seriously. He’s a joke, a fabrication, a fictitious nonsense, not to mention a thoroughly unpleasant manifestation of personal agenda driven by misplaced notions of superiority.

    “Budhau” is the invention of a regime propogandist, a self-described “former journalist”, whose favoured modus operand! is to use various guises to practice what Jean d’Ark has so brilliantly dubbed as “cyber squatting”.

    In our case, calling himself Viti TruthSeeker, our modern-day Lord Haw Haw bombarded FDN’s forum for some months with the same themes that we now hear espoused by “Budhau” on Solivakasama.

    And if you have been following the Your Comments pages of the Fiji Times you’ll notice that the same arguments and Lord Haw Haw tactics pop up again and again, this time voiced by other fake persona, such as “Shane White of Australia” or “Sack of Kaka.”

    The only positive thing we can say about Budhau/Shane White etc. is that his/their recitation of the same old rubbish only serves to remind the world of the patent illegality and dishonesty at the heart of Bainimarama’s coup and the total incompetence of an “interim government” whose only “achievement” has been to set Fiji on a course to economic ruin and social disaster.

    It’s ironic, really, when you think about it: the more “Budhau” manipulates facts and ducks and weaves the less his attempts to defend Bainimarama and his cohorts seem to work.

    No one, not even Budhau, can justify the illegal regime’s spectacular non-performance.

    And no one, least of all Budhau, can truly challenge the case for the immediate disbandment of Fiji’s illegal military-backed regime and the handing back to every Fiji citizen of his/her constitutional right to live under and participate in, a free and fair parliamentary democracy.

    Footnote: After World War II William Joyce, aka Lord Haw Haw, was hanged. Moral of that is quite simple (take note “Budhau”): it’s always better in the end to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

  8. Corruption Fighter Says:

    @FDN. Yeah, I think a few of us woke up to “Budhau” some time back.

    Budhau: why don’t you share with us your secret formula for dealing with cognitive dissonance, ie self re-invention. Put Viti Truth Seeker to sleep and wake up as Budhau. How do you do it without losing your mental balance? (This is a rhetorical question, pis don’t risk psychological injury by tryin to answer it.)

    More seriously, you say that Fiji’s problem is social, not political. Let’s assume that this is right, and that you mean by this what I might mean (eg too many Fijians live in villages without access to electricity, running water or good secondary schools), what is the solution to this problem other than restoration of the rule of law and democracy? First things first. Constitution, rule of law, democracy and then good governance and economic recovery.

  9. ex Fiji Tourist Says:

    Corruption Fighter

    I agree

    10/10

    Go to the top of the class.

    Fiji Democracy Now

    A brilliant summary of the silly tactics of Col. dimwiti and his green goons chained to their computers.

  10. Budhau Says:

    Fiji Democracy Now – The illegal regime is falling apart not because the “axis of power has shifted” – if is falling apart because those same folks in power are unable to run the country. Just because some in the military council would have liked to do the Chaudary investigation differently does not mean that there is a “shift in the axis of power” and that FB has moved towards to the AG. All FB did was instructed the AG to do his job in getting the inquiry going.

    As for my statement that our problem is not going to be solved by Qarase going to court – that is true – this is more of a political/social problem. That does not mean “forget the rule or law” – how do you think the “rule of law” would be achieved by winning this case in court.

    DN wrote, “Since illegally seizing power the regime has been doing its best to compromise the judiciary and manipulate the law by pulling stunts like the sham whitewash of the millionaire Labour Party Leader and famed benefactor of the poor, CHODOPU$$).”

    If is it true that the judiciary has been compromised – that would be another reason why Qarase should not be seeking justice in this court of law.

    When I wrote that you guys should cut out the crap about the psychological issues – FB being bipolar etc – I did not mean that you should stop discredit the IG and its leader – deal with the issues, discredit them on the issues – unlike some idiots in here who try to do this psychological analysis. BTW – that bipolar thingie – that ain’t the “truth”, that is plain silly.

    DN wrote, “Elsewhere on this site, “Budhau” talks about Bainimarama “negotiating” an end to his illegal regime. That’s another nonsense line from Budhau. Everyone knows that Bainimarama doesn’t negotiate. He proved that emphatically in the months leading up to his coup.”

    My point was that sooner or later Bainimarama will realize that he cannot continue. At that point he would still have some alternatives – my arguments is that he would then realize that a better alternative is to negotiate rather then go down fighting. Right now, he is in power and does not see a need to negotiate, but both you and I agree that things will not be the same for long.

    Democracy wrote, “So, there is no reason why anyone should take “Budhau” seriously. He’s a joke, a fabrication, a fictitious nonsense, not to mention a thoroughly unpleasant manifestation of personal agenda driven by misplaced notions of superiority.” – Good, so you are into psycho-analysis too. Me a ““cyber squatting” – squatting on your site, just like the Indians are doing in your country.

    DN wrote, “It’s ironic, really, when you think about it: the more “Budhau” manipulates facts and ducks and weaves the less his attempts to defend Bainimarama and his cohorts seem to work.”
    Why don’t you go find out one of my posts in here where I have defended Bainimarama.

    DN wrote, “immediate disbandment of Fiji’s illegal military-backed regime and the handing back to every Fiji citizen of his/her constitutional right to live under and participate in, a free and fair parliamentary democracy.”

    I totally with you, however, I do not think that will happen. And if it does not happen, what are we going to do about it – call the guy bipolar and vent our frustrations in here, or will guys like you try to vent out their frustrations on people like me.

    We have a culture in Fiji that does not believe in parliamentary democracy – If they would have just handed over power to Dr Bavadra in 1987, things may have been different. So tell us the truth – is this really about democracy – or this time, the wrong guys pulled the coup – what do you thing the other side might do when say the New Alliance and FLP wins the next election or the one after that – we can’t let Chodopu$$ become the PM, ever again, democracy or no democracy – right?

  11. Corruption Fighter Says:

    @Budhau you seem relentless in you follow-up of almost everything that anyone posts against you. The ‘almost’ is important, because you do let some comments go and they are always aimed at your weak spots. Reminds me of some one else I once knew. Now who was that? Oh yes, Viti Truth Seeker! And that also reminds me, you haven’t responded to my comment on your method of dealing with cognitive dissonance.

  12. Budhau Says:

    Corruption Fighter wrote, “More seriously, you say that Fiji’s problem is social, not political. Let’s assume that this is right, and that you mean by this what I might mean…”
    Mr Fighter – I did not say that Fiji’s problem is Social and not political.

    What I said was Fijia’s problem is a social AND political problem and that such problems can not resolved in a court of Law – Comprende?

    Mr Fighter wrote, “…(eg too many Fijians live in villages without access to electricity, running water or good secondary schools), what is the solution to this problem other than restoration of the rule of law and democracy? First things first. Constitution, rule of law, democracy and then good governance and economic recovery.”

    Yes, all that problems that you talk about, Fijians having no access to roads, electricity, running water, good schools – high mortality rate of infants, lack of medical facility – So you think that the solution to these problems is the restoration of the rule of law and democracy.

    I am sure you would have noticed that there same problems were there when we had democracy and the rule of law – and you seem to be a smart enough guy to recognize the fact that democracy and rule of law has very little to do with this problems of the Fijians.

    I am happy that you brought up this issue – Now, go as Qarase and the previous Fijian administrations why do we have these problems of the rural Fijians – this is what the Vanua should be asking.

    And once they realiaze this – they would than kick out these buggers – and once this military regime is done with – we will have a Fijian adminitration that would address the problems of the common Fijians – rather then those Chiefs and the elite that have been plundering for the last 30 or so years.

    As for the cognitive dissonance, how do you deal with this – you know that these bastards have screwed the rest of us for years, how do you keep on voting them in – I get it, you tell yourself that the Indians are a bigger threat than the thieving chiefs, so it is OK tho vote these buggers.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: